Loading...

Redeemed at Countless Cost

The Recovery of Iconographic Theology and Religious Experience from 1850 to 2000

by Stewart A. Dippel (Author)
Monographs XXVI, 214 Pages
Series: American University Studies , Volume 360

Summary

This book traces a recovery of iconographic religious experience and theology in the nineteenth century. In contrast to a logocentric religious focus, which privileges texts and their analysis, an iconographic focus emphasizes the visual and narrative attributes of religion. The introduction sets the stage by discussing the profound disquietude in the wake of Britain’s Religious Census of 1851, along with the various responses to a perceived decline in religiosity. Two subsequent chapters deal with the resurgence of iconographic religion from the perspective of theology proper, arguing that contemporary theologians, such as those represented by the Yale School of Divinity, held to a more holistic as opposed to a fragmentary approach towards scripture. In doing so they came to center the scriptural stories on the events surrounding Christ’s passion. The remaining chapters trace the recovery of iconographic religion through American, Russian, and British culture throughout the nineteenth century. Ultimately, this book argues for a revision on the standard ‘read’ regarding these artists and writers which holds that they were predominantly secular in orientation.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Illustrations
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1. Introduction: Ways and Means
  • Chapter 2. Rosie the Riveter, Norman Rockwell, and Religious Iconography
  • Chapter 3. Richard Hooker and Jeremy Taylor: Iconographic Theology Exemplified
  • Chapter 4. The Imaginative Quality of Experience: Resources for an Iconographic Theology
  • Chapter 5. The Recovery of a Religious Vision in Nineteenth-Century Russian Art
  • Chapter 6. The Iconographic Dimension of British Popular Culture Fin-de-Siecle: Plays and Painting
  • Chapter 7. The Religious Experience in Russian Literature
  • Index

Stewart A. Dippel

Redeemed at Countless Cost

The Recovery of Iconographic Theology
and Religious Experience
from 1850 to 2000

About the author

Stewart Dippel holds a Ph.D. from Ohio State University. For the last twenty-five years he has taught history and political science at the University of the Ozarks in Clarksville, Arkansas. His published dissertation and three subsequent books are on seventeenth-century religious history.

The Rev. Jeffrey Champlin is an ordained priest of the Episcopal Church. He has served congregations in Connecticut, Kansas, and Arkansas. He is a graduate of Wesleyan University (1978) and Yale Divinity School (1983). For the last four years, he has served as an instructor in the Iona Project, a church-wide program to provide through Dioceses academic and pastoral formation for locally-prepared candidates for ordination.

About the book

This book traces a recovery of iconographic religious experience and theology in the nineteenth century. In contrast to a logocentric religious focus, which privileges texts and their analysis, an iconographic focus emphasizes the visual and narrative attributes of religion. The introduction sets the stage by discussing the profound disquietude in the wake of Britain’s Religious Census of 1851, along with the various responses to a perceived decline in religiosity. Two subsequent chapters deal with the resurgence of iconographic religion from the perspective of theology proper, arguing that contemporary theologians, such as those represented by the Yale School of Divinity, held to a more holistic as opposed to a fragmentary approach towards scripture. In doing so they came to center the scriptural stories on the events surrounding Christ’s passion. The remaining chapters trace the recovery of iconographic religion through American, Russian, and British culture throughout the nineteenth century. Ultimately, this book argues for a revision on the standard ‘read’ regarding these artists and writers which holds that they were predominantly secular in orientation.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Illustrations

xi | xii→ ←xii | xiii→

image

Figure 1. Norman Rockwell “Rosie the Riveter” 1943. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, 2007.178. Photography by Dwight Primiano.←xiii | xiv→

image

Figure 2. Andrei Rublev “The Old Testament Trinity” 1422–27. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xiv | xv→

image

Figure 3. Alexander Ivanov “The Appearance of Christ to the People” 1837–57. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xv | xvi→

image

Figure 4. Ivan Kramskoy “Christ in the Wilderness” 1872–74. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xvi | xvii→

image

Figure 5. Vasily Perov “Christ Procession in a Kurskaya Village” {The Easter Procession} 1861. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xvii | xviii→

image

Figure 6. Vasily Surikov “The Morning of the Execution of the Streltsy” 1881. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xviii | xix→

image

Figure 7. Vasily Surikov “Menshikov in Beryozov” {Menshikov in Exile} 1884. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xix | xx→

image

Figure 8. Vasily Surikov “The Boyarynia Movozova” 1887. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xx | xxi→

image

Figure 9. Nikolay Ge {Gay} “Golgotha” 1892. By the kind permission of the owner, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.←xxi | xxii→

image

Figure 10. Ilya Repin “Golgotha” 1921–22. By the kind permission of the Princeton University Art Museum.←xxii | xxiii→

Acknowledgements

Stewart Dippel

Details

Pages
XXVI, 214
ISBN (PDF)
9781433143830
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433143847
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433143854
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433138881
Language
English
Publication date
2017 (June)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2017. XXVI, 214 pp.

Biographical notes

Stewart A. Dippel (Author)

Stewart Dippel holds a Ph.D. from Ohio State University. For the last twenty-five years he has taught history and political science at the University of the Ozarks in Clarksville, Arkansas. His published dissertation and three subsequent books are on seventeenth-century religious history. The Rev. Jeffrey Champlin is an ordained priest of the Episcopal Church. He has served congregations in Connecticut, Kansas, and Arkansas. He is a graduate of Wesleyan University (1978) and Yale Divinity School (1983). For the last four years, he has served as an instructor in the Iona Project, a church-wide program to provide through Dioceses academic and pastoral formation for locally-prepared candidates for ordination.

Previous

Title: Redeemed at Countless Cost