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Learning to be in the World with Others

Difficult Knowledge and Social Studies Education

by H. James Garrett (Author)
Textbook 160 Pages
Series: Counterpoints, Volume 506

Summary

In this book, H. James Garrett inquires into the processes of learning about the social world, populated as it often is with bewildering instances of loss, violence, and upheaval. In such learning, interactions invite and enliven our passionate responses, or prompt us to avoid them. Interpreting and working with these often emotional reactions is critical to social studies education and developing strategies for individuals to participate in democracy. Garrett illustrates ways that learning about the world does not occur in absence of our intimate relations to knowledge, the way learning sometimes feels like our undoing, and how new knowledge can feel more like a burden than an advantage.

Table Of Contents

  • Title
  • Cover
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
  • Preface
  • References
  • Acknowledgments
  • Permissions
  • Chapter 1. Introduction: Difficult Knowledge, Psychoanalysis, and Social Studies Education
  • Difficult Knowledge
  • Teacher Education and Changing Your Mind
  • Psychoanalysis
  • Chapter Overview
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Difficult Knowledge: Encounters with Social Trauma in Pedagogy
  • Defining Difficult Knowledge
  • Our Own Time Is Not Our Own
  • Internal Conflicts the Learner Brings to Learning
  • Difficult Knowledge in the Pedagogical Relationship
  • Difficult Knowledge as Encounters with Representations
  • Difficult Knowledge Studies
  • Contextualizing Difficult Knowledge: Trauma, Crisis, and Vulnerability
  • Trauma
  • Vulnerability
  • Crisis
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Traces in Narratives About Knowledge: Evidence, Controversy and Difficult Knowledge
  • Social Studies in/as Relation
  • Social Studies From the Beginning
  • The Adolescent Social Studies Curriculum
  • Contestation and Controversy in Social Studies Education
  • What Is Going On in a Controversy?
  • The Evidence of the Insufficiency of Evidence
  • Ignorance as Evidence
  • Conflict and Tolerating Uncertainty
  • Social Studies and the Loss of Lovely Knowledge
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Movements of Difficult Knowledge
  • Defense Mechanisms
  • Is there a Psychoanalytic Research Methodology?
  • Participants
  • Research Context
  • Methods
  • Routing and Re-­Routing of Difficult Knowledge
  • Route 1: From Student to Teacher to Student
  • The Significance of Placing Uncertainty Onto the Student
  • Route 2: From Race to Class
  • The Significance of Routing Away from Race
  • Conclusions
  • Note
  • References
  • Chapter 5. The Presence of History and Learning to Teach: Novel Reading in Social Studies Education
  • Difficult Knowledge and Full Speech
  • Context of Inquiry
  • Difficult Knowledge and Full Speech
  • Reading Beloved as Pedagogical Text
  • Re-­cognizing and Reading Beloved and/in Teacher Education
  • Aesthetic Conflict in Encountering the Historical Novel
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Questions and Perspectives in Social Studies Education
  • Context(s) of Inquiry
  • What Is the “This”?
  • Moving within the Question: Figuring Crisis with Pedagogy and Learning
  • Learning as Crisis in the Multiplying of Perspective
  • Multiplying Perspectives in Social Studies Education
  • Conclusion: Going without Answers
  • References
  • Index
  • Studies in Criticality

H. James Garrett

learning to be
in the world
with others

difficult knowledge & social studies education

About the author

H. JAMES GARRETT is Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice at the University of Georgia in Athens. He received his Ph.D. in curriculum, instruction, and teacher education from Michigan State University.

About the book

In this book, H. James Garrett inquires into the processes of learning about the social world, populated as it often is with bewildering instances of loss, violence, and upheaval. In such learning, interactions invite and enliven our passionate responses, or prompt us to avoid them. Interpreting and working with these often emotional reactions is critical to social studies education and developing strategies for individuals to participate in democracy. Garrett illustrates ways that learning about the world does not occur in absence of our intimate relations to knowledge, the way learning sometimes feels like our undoing, and how new knowledge can feel more like a burden than an advantage.

“A finely written meditation on the place of difficult knowledge in the teaching of social studies, H. James Garrett’s book calls upon teachers and teacher educators to attend to both the knowing and the unknowing, the engaging and the resisting that unfolds in their classrooms. He reminds us that social education fundamentally involves imagining, constructing, and defending the self in relation to the other, with affective and unconscious processes that are deeply imbricated in the experience of learning. His skillful use of psychoanalytic theory in uncovering these dimensions of social education, based in examples drawn from history, literature, and film, provides a powerful, if implicit, critique of what matters in schooling, with significant implications for contemporary policy and practice in social studies teaching and teacher education.”

—Margaret Crocco, Professor and Chairperson, Department of Teacher Education, Core Faculty, Center for Gender in Global Context, College of Education, Michigan State University

“An affecting vision of social education is the heart of H. James Garrett’s studies of the challenges of being touched by history, literature, and social thought. Readers will find moving portraits of learning from the reception and conveyance of social studies from the inside/out; then, experience the passionate embrace of thinking. Indeed, Garrett presents a new kind of writing for social studies that emerges from our emotional situation of being in the world with others. His work is a superb contribution to the growing field of psychoanalysis in education.”

—Deborah P. Britzman, Author of A Psychoanalyst in the Classroom: Studies of the Human Condition of Education (2015)

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Details

Pages
160
ISBN (PDF)
9781433139666
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433139673
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433139680
ISBN (Softcover)
9781433132377
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433132384
DOI
10.3726/978-1-4331-3966-6
Language
English
Publication date
2017 (February)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2017. XIV, 160 pp.

Biographical notes

H. James Garrett (Author)

H. James Garrett is Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice at the University of Georgia in Athens. He received his Ph.D. in curriculum, instruction, and teacher education from Michigan State University.

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Title: Learning to be in the World with Others