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Jazz in Europe

New Music in the Old Continent

by Igor Wasserberger (Author)
Edited Collection XXVIII, 510 Pages

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Figures
  • Foreword: Jazz and Europe in the Twentieth Century: Dominants and Stereotypes of the New Music in the Old Continent (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 1: Great Britain (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 2: France and the Francophone Countries (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 3: Austria (Antonín Matzner)
  • 4: Germany (Antonín Matzner)
  • 5: The Soviet Union (Antonín Matzner)
  • 6: Switzerland (Antonín Matzner)
  • 7: Italy (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 8: Hungary (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 9: Scandinavian Countries and the Nordic Concept (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 10: The Netherlands (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 11: The Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 12: Yugoslavia and Succession Countries: Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia (Igor Wasserberger)
  • 13: Poland (Igor Wasserberger / Peter Motycka)
  • 14: The Czech Lands (Antonín Matzner)
  • 15: Slovakia: Slovak Jazz in the Czechoslovak Era (Igor Wasserberger / Peter Motycka)
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Index

← vi | vii →

Figures

Cover photo: Tomasz Stańko.
International Jazzfestival Saalfelden, Austria, August 2006.
© Patrick Španko

← xvi | xvii →

IGOR WASSERBERGER

Foreword: Jazz and Europe in the Twentieth Century: Dominants and Stereotypes of the New Music in the Old Continent

In the last three decades the idea of ‘Europeanism’ has gained accelerating currency in various areas, particularly and understandably for political reasons. As a result of the meeting of pan-European perceptions, we have become used to a new outlook: we now understand phenomena in a wider context than their national boundaries. Jazz, however, fully anticipated this process from the time of its continental domestication. From the beginning of the 1920s jazz belonged among those areas that accepted European unity naturally and for which officially established European fellow-feeling was not needed.

Details

Pages
XXVIII, 510
ISBN (PDF)
9781788743198
ISBN (ePUB)
9781788743204
ISBN (MOBI)
9781788743211
ISBN (Book)
9781788743181
Language
English
Publication date
2018 (September)
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Wien, 2018. XXVIII, 510 pp., 93 b/w ill.

Biographical notes

Igor Wasserberger (Author)

Igor Wasserberger (born 1937 in Bratislava, Slovakia) has been active as a jazz theoretician and writer since the early 1960s. He collaborated on the Encyclopedia of Jazz and Modern Popular Music (together with Antonín Matzner and Ivan Poledňák, 1980–90) and is also the author of Jazz Profiles (co-author Antonín Matzner, 1969) and Phenomena of Contemporary Jazz (2003). Antonín Matzner (born 1944 in Plzeň, Czech Republic; died 2017 in Prague) was a music theoretician and writer. Among his most important achievements are the four-volume Encyclopedia of Jazz and Modern Popular Music, which he co-wrote and co-edited (1980–90), The Beatles, the Voice of a Generation (Prague, 1987), Czech Film Music (coauthor Jiří Pilka, Prague, 2002) and Sixty Prague Springs (Prague, 2006). Peter Motyčka (born 1978 in Michalovce, Slovakia) is a writer on music with a focus on jazz, as well as editing the monthly classical music magazine Hudobný život published by Music Centre Slovakia (Hudobné centrum). He participated in the Jazz in Eastern Europe project run by the Osteuropa-Institut at Freie Universität Berlin (2007–10).

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Title: Jazz in Europe