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Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2018

by Centro di Ateneo per i Diritti Umani (Volume editor)
Thesis 348 Pages
Series: Human Right Studies, Volume 9

Summary

The Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2018 offers an up-to-date overview of the measures Italy has taken to adapt its legislation and policies to inter-national human rights law and to comply with commitments voluntarily assumed by the Italian Government at the international level on the sub-ject of fundamental rights. The 2018 Yearbook surveys the most significant activities of national and local Italian actors at domestic and international level, including civil society organisations and universities. It also dedicates space to recommendations made by international monitoring bodies within the framework of the United Nations, OSCE, the Council of Europe, and the European Union. Finally, the Yearbook provides a selection of in-ternational and national case-law that casts light on Italy's position vis-à-vis internationally recognised human rights."Italy and Human Rights in 2017: Time to Restart" is the title of the 2018 Year-book introduction. From this year onwards, the Yearbook will present an in-depth analysis on various human rights themes. This edition is dedicated to the state of implementation of Italy’s Special Action Plan against Sexual and Gender-based Violence 2015.The Italian Agenda of Human Rights 2018 represents an updated orienta-tion tool with regards to the main initiatives to be undertaken on the leg-islative, infrastructural and policy-making fronts in order to strengthen the Italian system for promoting and protecting human rights.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Acronyms
  • Italy and Human Rights in 2017: Time to Restart
  • Italian Human Rights Agenda 2018
  • Structure of the Yearbook 2018
  • In-depth Analysis. The Special Action Plan against Sexual and Gender-based Violence 2015: Implementation and Feasibility of a National Action Plan
  • I. Male Violence against Women in Italy
  • II. Analysis of the Italian Action Plan in the Light of International Standards
  • III. Conclusion: is the Italian NAP a Good Plan?
  • Part I. The Reception Of International Rules On Human Rights In Italy
  • International Human Rights Law
  • I. Legal Instruments of the United Nations
  • II. Legal Instruments on Disarmament and Non-proliferation
  • III. Legal Instruments of the Council of Europe
  • IV. European Union Law
  • Italian Law
  • I. Constitution of the Italian Republic
  • II. National Legislation
  • III. Municipal, Provincial and Regional Statutes
  • IV. Regional Laws
  • Part II. The Human Rights Infrastructure in Italy
  • National Bodies with Jurisdiction over Human Rights
  • I. Parliamentary Bodies
  • II. Prime Minister’s Office (Presidency)
  • III. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation
  • IV. Ministry of Labour and Social Policies
  • V. Ministry of Justice
  • VI. Judicial Authorities
  • VII. Independent Authorities
  • VIII. Non-Governmental Organisations
  • IX. Teaching and Research on Human Rights in Italian Universities
  • Sub-national Human Rights Structures
  • I. Peace Human Rights Offices in Municipalities, Provinces and Regions
  • II. Ombudspersons in the Italian Regions and Provinces
  • III. National Coordinating Body of Ombudspersons
  • IV. Network of Ombudspersons for Children and Adolescents
  • V. National Coordinating Body of Local Authorities for Peace and Human Rights
  • VI. Archives and Other Regional Projects for the Promotion of a Culture of Peace and Human Rights
  • Region of Veneto
  • I. Department for International Relations, Communications and SISTAR
  • II. Committee for Human Rights and the Culture of Peace
  • III. Committee for Development Cooperation
  • IV. Regional Archive “Pace Diritti Umani – Peace Human Rights”
  • V. Venice for Peace Research Foundation
  • VI. Human Rights Authority
  • VII. Regional Commission for Equal Opportunities between Men and Women
  • VIII. Regional Observatory on Immigration
  • Part III. Italy in Dialogue with International Human Rights Institutions
  • The United Nations System
  • I. General Assembly
  • II. Human Rights Council
  • III. High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
  • IV. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
  • V. Human Rights Treaty Bodies
  • VI. Specialised United Nations Agencies, Programmes and Funds
  • Council of Europe
  • I. Parliamentary Assembly
  • II. Committee of Ministers
  • III. European Court of Human Rights
  • IV. Committee for the Prevention of Torture
  • V. European Committee of Social Rights
  • VI. Commissioner for Human Rights
  • VII. European Commission against Racism and Intolerance
  • VIII. Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities
  • IX. European Commission for Democracy through Law
  • X. Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings
  • XI. Group of States against Corruption
  • XII. Group of Experts on Action against Violence against Women and Domestic Violence
  • XIII. Lanzarote Committee
  • European Union
  • I. European Parliament
  • II. European Commission
  • III. Council of the European Union
  • IV. Court of Justice of the European Union
  • V. European External Action Service
  • VI. Special Representative for Human Rights
  • VII. Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA)
  • VIII. European Ombudsman
  • IX. European Data Protection Supervisor
  • Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE)
  • I. Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR)
  • II. High Commissioner on National Minorities
  • III. Representative on Freedom of the Media
  • IV. Special Representative and Coordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings
  • Humanitarian and Criminal Law
  • I. Adaptation to International Humanitarian and Criminal Law
  • II. Italian Contribution to the “Peacekeeping” Missions and other International Missions
  • Part IV. National and International Case-Law
  • Human Rights in Italian Case-law
  • I. Aspects of the Relationship between the Italian Justice System and European Case-law
  • II. Dignity of the Person, Right to Identity
  • III. Political Rights and Freedom of Association; Citizenship; Freedom of the Press
  • IV. Asylum and International Protection
  • V. Discrimination – General Issues
  • VI. Rights of Persons with Disabilities
  • VII. Social Rights
  • VIII. Immigration
  • IX. Right to Private and Family Life. Right to Property
  • X. Children’s Rights
  • XI. Due Process: the “Pinto” Act
  • XII. Criminal Issues
  • Italy in the Case-law of the European Court of Human Rights
  • I. Torture, Right to Liberty, Right to Life
  • II. Fair Trial, Right to Property
  • III. Private and Family Life
  • IV. Freedom of Expression, Freedom of Movement
  • Italy in the Case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union
  • I. Equal Treatment in Family Services
  • II. Age-based Discrimination on Employment and Working Conditions
  • III. Right to be Heard in a Case of Denied International Protection
  • IV. Ne Bis in Idem and Double-track Sanctions (Administrative and Penal) for the Omitted Payment of the VAT
  • Index
  • Table of Cases
  • Series index

Italian Yearbook
of Human Rights 2018

About the author

The Yearbook is edited by the University of Padova Human Rights Centre "Antonio Papisca", in cooperation with the UNESCO Chair in Human Rights, Democracy and Peace of the same University. The Centre, established in 1982 with the support of the Region of Veneto, carries out research and education following a global and interdisciplinary approach.

About the book

The Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2018 offers an up-to-date overview of the measures Italy has taken to adapt its legislation and policies to inter-national human rights law and to comply with commitments voluntarily assumed by the Italian Government at the international level on the sub-ject of fundamental rights. The 2018 Yearbook surveys the most significant activities of national and local Italian actors at domestic and international level, including civil society organisations and universities. It also dedicates space to recommendations made by international monitoring bodies within the framework of the United Nations, OSCE, the Council of Europe, and the European Union. Finally, the Yearbook provides a selection of in-ternational and national case-law that casts light on Italy's position vis-à-vis internationally recognised human rights.

"Italy and Human Rights in 2017: Time to Restart” is the title of the 2018 Yearbook introduction. From this year onwards, the Yearbook will present an in-depth analysis on various human rights themes. This edition is dedicated to the state of implementation of Italy’s Special Action Plan against Sexual and Gender-based Violence 2015.

The Italian Agenda of Human Rights 2018 represents an updated orienta-tion tool with regards to the main initiatives to be undertaken on the leg-islative, infrastructural and policy-making fronts in order to strengthen the Italian system for promoting and protecting human rights.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Table of Contents

List of Acronyms

Italy and Human Rights in 2017: Time to Restart

Italian Human Rights Agenda 2018

Structure of the Yearbook 2018

In-depth Analysis. The Special Action Plan against Sexual and Gender-based Violence 2015: Implementation and Feasibility of a National Action Plan

I. Male Violence against Women in Italy

II. Analysis of the Italian Action Plan in the Light of International Standards

III. Conclusion: is the Italian NAP a Good Plan?

Part I. The Reception Of International Rules On Human Rights In Italy

International Human Rights Law

I. Legal Instruments of the United Nations

II. Legal Instruments on Disarmament and Non-proliferation

III. Legal Instruments of the Council of Europe

IV. European Union Law

Italian Law

I. Constitution of the Italian Republic

II. National Legislation

III. Municipal, Provincial and Regional Statutes

IV. Regional Laws

Part II. The Human Rights Infrastructure in Italy

National Bodies with Jurisdiction over Human Rights

I. Parliamentary Bodies

II. Prime Minister’s Office (Presidency)

III. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation

IV. Ministry of Labour and Social Policies←7 | 8→

V. Ministry of Justice

VI. Judicial Authorities

VII. Independent Authorities

VIII. Non-Governmental Organisations

IX. Teaching and Research on Human Rights in Italian Universities

Sub-national Human Rights Structures

I. Peace Human Rights Offices in Municipalities, Provinces and Regions

II. Ombudspersons in the Italian Regions and Provinces

III. National Coordinating Body of Ombudspersons

IV. Network of Ombudspersons for Children and Adolescents

V. National Coordinating Body of Local Authorities for Peace and Human Rights

VI. Archives and Other Regional Projects for the Promotion of a Culture of Peace and Human Rights

Region of Veneto

I. Department for International Relations, Communications and SISTAR

II. Committee for Human Rights and the Culture of Peace

III. Committee for Development Cooperation

IV. Regional Archive “Pace Diritti Umani – Peace Human Rights”

V. Venice for Peace Research Foundation

VI. Human Rights Authority

VII. Regional Commission for Equal Opportunities between Men and Women

VIII. Regional Observatory on Immigration

Part III. Italy in Dialogue with International Human Rights Institutions

The United Nations System

I. General Assembly

II. Human Rights Council

III. High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

IV. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

V. Human Rights Treaty Bodies

VI. Specialised United Nations Agencies, Programmes and Funds←8 | 9→

Council of Europe

I. Parliamentary Assembly

II. Committee of Ministers

III. European Court of Human Rights

IV. Committee for the Prevention of Torture

V. European Committee of Social Rights

VI. Commissioner for Human Rights

VII. European Commission against Racism and Intolerance

VIII. Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities

IX. European Commission for Democracy through Law

X. Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings

XI. Group of States against Corruption

XII. Group of Experts on Action against Violence against Women and Domestic Violence

XIII. Lanzarote Committee

European Union

I. European Parliament

II. European Commission

III. Council of the European Union

IV. Court of Justice of the European Union

V. European External Action Service

VI. Special Representative for Human Rights

VII. Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA)

VIII. European Ombudsman

IX. European Data Protection Supervisor

Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE)

Details

Pages
348
ISBN (PDF)
9782807609822
ISBN (ePUB)
9782807609839
ISBN (MOBI)
9782807609846
ISBN (Softcover)
9782807609815
Language
English
Publication date
2018 (December)
Published
Bruxelles, Bern, Berlin, New York, Oxford, Warsawa, Wien, 348 p., 15 ill. b/w, 30 tab. b/w

Biographical notes

Centro di Ateneo per i Diritti Umani (Volume editor)

The Yearbook is edited by the University of Padova Human Rights Centre "Antonio Papisca", in cooperation with the UNESCO Chair in Human Rights, Democracy and Peace of the same University. The Centre, established in 1982 with the support of the Region of Veneto, carries out research and education following a global and interdisciplinary approach.

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Title: Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2018