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The Mimetic Strand in the Cello Literature

Within the Context of History, Instrument Design, Iconography and Cello Performance

by Urszula Mizia (Author)
Monographs 334 Pages
Open Access

Summary

This book is the first integral study of the history of imitative or co-creative artistic work that has led to the creation of cello transcriptions and arrangements. Of an interdisciplinary character, it explores the views that have shaped approaches to the art of cello performance and describes the role of cello transcriptions and the development of instrument making. The book also addresses issues related to philosophy, history of aesthetics and visual arts, including iconography presenting historical images of the cello. The theoretical part contains definitions and systematics that make it possible to categorise the vast amount of transcriptions, as well as descriptions and suggested recordings of a selection of those transcriptions.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Mimesis – general issues
  • 1.1. Mimesis and the art of music
  • 1.2. Periodisation of the evolution of mimetic cello performance
  • Chapter 2: The Renaissance and the Baroque: the first evidence of the cello, the instrument’s design and the earliest mimetic cello repertoire; terminology, iconography
  • 2.1. Mimesis and Renaissance instruments
  • 2.2. Renaissance instruments and the design of the cello
  • 2.3. The cello and ensemble performance practice: pre-arrangement, pre-transcription and self-transcription
  • 2.4. Italian masters of the cello
  • 2.5. Cello making schools, cello makers and extant instruments
  • 2.5.1. The beginnings of cello making
  • 2.5.2. The art of cello making in Cremona
  • 2.5.3. Other cello making centres in Italy
  • 2.5.4. The cello in the Commonwealth of Poland-Lithuania and in Royal Prussia: hypotheses and views
  • 2.5.5. The design of a Baroque cello and bow
  • 2.6. Cello terminology in documents and treatises
  • 2.6.1. Cello nomenclature in Europe
  • 2.6.2. Cello nomenclature in Poland
  • 2.7. The depiction of the cello in European art of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries
  • 2.7.1. Iconography as a source of knowledge about the cello
  • 2.7.2. The cello in Italian painting
  • 2.7.3. Representations of the cello in Flemish art
  • 2.7.4. Paintings depicting the cello in Dutch art
  • 2.7.5. The earliest traces of the cello in other European countries
  • 2.7.6. Summary
  • 2.7.7. Drawing, painting and sculpture with the cello and hybrid instruments in Poland
  • 2.7.8. Sacred painting and sculpture depicting a cello
  • Chapter 3: The late Baroque, cello transcriptions and arrangements after 1687
  • 3.1. The cello as an alternative instrument
  • 3.1.1. General issues
  • 3.1.2. The cello and the viola da gamba
  • 3.1.3. Artistic transcription, self-transcription and polyversions for solo cello
  • 3.2. Cellists active in Europe from 1688 to 1750
  • 3.3. The art of cello making after 1687
  • 3.3.1. Cello making in Europe
  • 3.3.2. The art of cello making in Cremona
  • 3.3.3. The art of cello making in Brescia and Bologna
  • 3.3.4. The art of cello making in Milan
  • 3.3.5. The art of cello making in Venice
  • 3.3.6. The art of cello making in Rome
  • 3.3.7. Other Italian centres for cello making
  • 3.3.8. European cello makers active outside Italy
  • 3.3.9. Design changes and conversions of cellos and bows after 1700
  • 3.4. The European expansion of the cello, as documented in art from the turn of the eighteenth century
  • 3.4.1. Baroque and Rococo iconography with a cello motif – introduction
  • 3.4.2. Depictions of the cello in Italian art
  • 3.4.3. Paintings and drawings with cellos in British, Austrian and Germany art
  • 3.4.4. Iconography with a cello motif in Flemish and Dutch art
  • 3.4.5. Depictions of the cello in French and Spanish art
  • 3.4.6. Sacred sculpture with depictions of a cello in Poland
  • 3.5. The form of musical instruments called violoncello and their repertoire
  • 3.5.1. Introduction
  • 3.5.2. Hybrids and conversions
  • 3.5.3. Repertoire for the viola da gamba or cello – selected concepts relating to the original instruments
  • 3.5.4. Violoncello piccolo
  • 3.5.5. Historical Baroque cellos
  • 3.5.6. Viola da spalla, hybrids and violoncello piccolo in iconography
  • Chapter 4: Classicism and the mimesis aesthetic, mimetic musical forms, the Classical cello of the years 1750–1815/20
  • 4.1 The aesthetic category of mimesis during the second half of the eighteenth century
  • 4.2. Arrangements and transcriptions in Classical musical forms
  • 4.2.1. Classical variations
  • 4.2.2. Classical sonatas, self-transcriptions and polyversions
  • 4.2.3. Virtuosic cadenzas in cello concertos
  • 4.2.4 The compass of Classical works for cello within the context of the original instruments, performance practice and iconography
  • 4.2.5. Editions and arrangements of Classical works, taking as an example Jean-Baptiste Bréval’s Sonata No. 5 in G major, Op. 12
  • 4.2.6. Contemporary views on transcriptions and arrangements of works by Luigi Boccherini
  • 4.3. Classical violin makers and their cellos
  • 4.3.1. Innovations in cello design 1750–1815
  • 4.3.2. The Italian art of cello making during the second half of the eighteenth century
  • 4.3.3. The art of cello making in Britain and France
  • 4.3.4. Other centres of cello making
  • 4.4. European iconography featuring the cello during the Classical era
  • 4.4.1. Changes to the image of the cello during the second half of the eighteenth century
  • 4.4.2. Italian and British art featuring the cello
  • 4.4.3. French paintings with cellos
  • 4.4.4. German, Flemish and Swedish art with cellos
  • 4.4.5. Summary
  • 4.5. The evolution of cello design from the Baroque to the Classical era
  • 4.6. Obtaining approximate dimensions of necks and fingerboards of Baroque and Classical cellos from photographic documentation
  • 4.7. The compass of works for cello and the instrument’s actual performance capacities
  • 4.8. The views of contemporary cellists on original instruments and the period performance of Classical works
  • 4.9. Between Classicism and Romanticism
  • Chapter 5: The art of cello transcription and arrangement during the Romantic era
  • 5.1. The mimetic strand and cello performance in the nineteenth century
  • 5.2. The art of cello transcription and arrangement after 1815/20
  • 5.2.1. Romantic variations, fantasies, potpourris, transcriptions and paraphrases
  • 5.2.2. The Romantic literal transcription of a cyclic form: Franz Schubert’s Sonata in A minor, D 821 for arpeggione and piano
  • 5.3. Cellists in the entourage of Fryderyk Chopin (1810–1849) and cello transcriptions of his works
  • 5.4. A new profession: the cellist transcriber and arranger
  • 5.4.1. Friedrich Ludwig Grützmacher (1832–1903) as a transcriber
  • 5.4.2. Other transcribers of the German school
  • 5.4.3. Transcribers of the French and Russian schools
  • 5.4.4. Other European transcribers
  • 5.4.5. Arrangers of works for cello
  • 5.5. The output of Polish composers in transcriptions
  • 5.6. The popularisation of the cello in Poland, transcriptions, arrangements and polyversions
  • 5.7. Virtuosic cadenzas
  • 5.8. Composers and their self-transcriptions
  • Chapter 6: The cello and the mimetic current in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries
  • 6.1. New trends in music and cello transcription
  • 6.2. Cello arrangements and transcriptions and their composers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries
  • 6.2.1. European cellist-transcribers
  • 6.2.2. Cello transcription in Poland
  • 6.3. The mimetic art and aesthetic, ethical and legal issues
  • Appendix I: Theory
  • 1. The etymology and meaning of the word transcription; definitions and related terms; definition of cello transcription
  • 2. A systematics of cello transcriptions with examples
  • 2.1. The classification of cello transcriptions in terms of the degree to which the original is preserved
  • 2.1.1. Faithful cello transcriptions: substantial, natural, literal
  • 2.1.2. Structural cello transcriptions
  • 2.1.3. Syntactic cello transcriptions
  • 2.1.4. Recontextual cello transcriptions
  • 2.1.5. Functional cello transcriptions
  • 2.2. The classification of cello transcriptions according to original forces
  • 2.2.1. String instruments and transcriptions of their repertoire
  • 2.2.2. Struck string instruments and transcriptions from their repertoire
  • 2.2.3. Plucked string instruments and transcriptions from their repertoire
  • 2.2.4. Woodwind and brass instruments and transcriptions of their repertoire
  • 2.2.5. Cello transcriptions of vocal works
  • Appendix II: Concert transcriptions for cello. Description of the works recorded on the CD
  • Concert transcriptions for cello
  • Bibliography
  • Summary
  • About the Author
  • Index

Bibliographic Information published by the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek
The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche
Nationalbibliografie; detailed bibliographic data is available online at
http://dnb.d-nb.de.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
A CIP catalog record for this book has been applied for at the
Library of Congress.

About the author

Urszula Mizia is a cellist, teacher and music event organiser. She works at the University of Silesia in Katowice (Poland) as an associate professor at the Faculty of Arts and Educational Science. From 2016 to 2019, she was the vice-director of the Institute of Music. She obtained her PhD in 2001 at Cracow Academy of Music, and her habilitation in 2013 at Gdańsk Academy of Music. Since 1995, she has been the president of the Bielsko-Biała Music Society.

About the book

This book is the first integral study of the history of imitative or co-creative artistic work that has led to the creation of cello transcriptions and arrangements. Of an interdisciplinary character, it explores the views that have shaped approaches to the art of cello performance and describes the role of cello transcriptions and the development of instrument making. The book also addresses issues related to philosophy, history of aesthetics and visual arts, including iconography presenting historical images of the cello. The theoretical part contains definitions and systematics that make it possible to categorise the vast amount of transcriptions, as well as descriptions and suggested recordings of a selection of those transcriptions.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Mimesis – general issues

1.1. Mimesis and the art of music

1.2. Periodisation of the evolution of mimetic cello performance

Chapter 2: The Renaissance and the Baroque: the first evidence of the cello, the instrument’s design and the earliest mimetic cello repertoire; terminology, iconography

2.1. Mimesis and Renaissance instruments

2.2. Renaissance instruments and the design of the cello

2.3. The cello and ensemble performance practice: pre-arrangement, pre-transcription and self-transcription

2.4. Italian masters of the cello

2.5. Cello making schools, cello makers and extant instruments

2.5.1. The beginnings of cello making

2.5.2. The art of cello making in Cremona

2.5.3. Other cello making centres in Italy

2.5.4. The cello in the Commonwealth of Poland-Lithuania and in Royal Prussia: hypotheses and views

2.5.5. The design of a Baroque cello and bow

2.6. Cello terminology in documents and treatises

2.6.1. Cello nomenclature in Europe

2.6.2. Cello nomenclature in Poland

2.7. The depiction of the cello in European art of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries

2.7.1. Iconography as a source of knowledge about the cello

2.7.2. The cello in Italian painting

2.7.3. Representations of the cello in Flemish art

2.7.4. Paintings depicting the cello in Dutch art

2.7.5. The earliest traces of the cello in other European countries

2.7.6. Summary

2.7.7. Drawing, painting and sculpture with the cello and hybrid instruments in Poland

2.7.8. Sacred painting and sculpture depicting a cello

Chapter 3: The late Baroque, cello transcriptions and arrangements after 1687

3.1. The cello as an alternative instrument

3.1.1. General issues

3.1.2. The cello and the viola da gamba

3.1.3. Artistic transcription, self-transcription and polyversions for solo cello

3.2. Cellists active in Europe from 1688 to 1750

3.3. The art of cello making after 1687

3.3.1. Cello making in Europe

3.3.2. The art of cello making in Cremona

3.3.3. The art of cello making in Brescia and Bologna

3.3.4. The art of cello making in Milan

3.3.5. The art of cello making in Venice

3.3.6. The art of cello making in Rome

3.3.7. Other Italian centres for cello making

3.3.8. European cello makers active outside Italy

3.3.9. Design changes and conversions of cellos and bows after 1700

3.4. The European expansion of the cello, as documented in art from the turn of the eighteenth century

3.4.1. Baroque and Rococo iconography with a cello motif – introduction

3.4.2. Depictions of the cello in Italian art

3.4.3. Paintings and drawings with cellos in British, Austrian and Germany art

3.4.4. Iconography with a cello motif in Flemish and Dutch art

3.4.5. Depictions of the cello in French and Spanish art

3.4.6. Sacred sculpture with depictions of a cello in Poland

3.5. The form of musical instruments called violoncello and their repertoire

3.5.1. Introduction

3.5.2. Hybrids and conversions

3.5.3. Repertoire for the viola da gamba or cello selected concepts relating to the original instruments

3.5.4. Violoncello piccolo

3.5.5. Historical Baroque cellos

3.5.6. Viola da spalla, hybrids and violoncello piccolo in iconography

Chapter 4: Classicism and the mimesis aesthetic, mimetic musical forms, the Classical cello of the years 1750–1815/20

4.1 The aesthetic category of mimesis during the second half of the eighteenth century

4.2. Arrangements and transcriptions in Classical musical forms

4.2.1. Classical variations

4.2.2. Classical sonatas, self-transcriptions and polyversions

4.2.3. Virtuosic cadenzas in cello concertos

4.2.4 The compass of Classical works for cello within the context of the original instruments, performance practice and iconography

4.2.5. Editions and arrangements of Classical works, taking as an example Jean-Baptiste Bréval’s Sonata No. 5 in G major, Op. 12

4.2.6. Contemporary views on transcriptions and arrangements of works by Luigi Boccherini

4.3. Classical violin makers and their cellos

4.3.1. Innovations in cello design 1750–1815

4.3.2. The Italian art of cello making during the second half of the eighteenth century

4.3.3. The art of cello making in Britain and France

4.3.4. Other centres of cello making

4.4. European iconography featuring the cello during the Classical era

4.4.1. Changes to the image of the cello during the second half of the eighteenth century

4.4.2. Italian and British art featuring the cello

4.4.3. French paintings with cellos

4.4.4. German, Flemish and Swedish art with cellos

4.4.5. Summary

4.5. The evolution of cello design from the Baroque to the Classical era

4.6. Obtaining approximate dimensions of necks and fingerboards of Baroque and Classical cellos from photographic documentation

4.7. The compass of works for cello and the instrument’s actual performance capacities

4.8. The views of contemporary cellists on original instruments and the period performance of Classical works

4.9. Between Classicism and Romanticism

Chapter 5: The art of cello transcription and arrangement during the Romantic era

5.1. The mimetic strand and cello performance in the nineteenth century

5.2. The art of cello transcription and arrangement after 1815/20

5.2.1. Romantic variations, fantasies, potpourris, transcriptions and paraphrases

5.2.2. The Romantic literal transcription of a cyclic form: Franz Schubert’s Sonata in A minor, D 821 for arpeggione and piano

5.3. Cellists in the entourage of Fryderyk Chopin (1810–1849) and cello transcriptions of his works

5.4. A new profession: the cellist transcriber and arranger

5.4.1. Friedrich Ludwig Grützmacher (1832–1903) as a transcriber

5.4.2. Other transcribers of the German school

5.4.3. Transcribers of the French and Russian schools

5.4.4. Other European transcribers

5.4.5. Arrangers of works for cello

5.5. The output of Polish composers in transcriptions

5.6. The popularisation of the cello in Poland, transcriptions, arrangements and polyversions

5.7. Virtuosic cadenzas

5.8. Composers and their self-transcriptions

Chapter 6: The cello and the mimetic current in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries

Details

Pages
334
ISBN (PDF)
9783631826287
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631826294
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631826300
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631806142
Open Access
CC-BY-NC-ND
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (September)
Tags
Mimesis Cello history Cello construction Cello performance and emancipation Cello transcriptions Cello iconography
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2020. 334 pp., 34 fig. b/w, 2 tables.

Biographical notes

Urszula Mizia (Author)

Urszula Mizia is a cellist, teacher and music event organiser. She works at the University of Silesia in Katowice (Poland) as an associate professor at the Faculty of Arts and Educational Science. From 2016 to 2019, she was the vice-director of the Institute of Music. She obtained her PhD in 2001 at Cracow Academy of Music, and her habilitation in 2013 at Gdańsk Academy of Music. Since 1995, she has been the president of the Bielsko-Biała Music Society.

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Title: The Mimetic Strand in the Cello Literature