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The Global North and South: Comparative Postcolonial Poetics in Diasporic South Asian Women’s Texts JASPAL KAUR SINGH The Global North and South The Global North and South c h a p t e r s i x This chapter examines the poetics of resistance to gendered identity formations in Diasporic South Asian Women’s texts and their interconnections to the In- dian and South African nation- states. I argue that in their re- envisioning of Indianness and Indian womanhood, certain writers are themselves limited due to their location and class politics. I examine texts

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separateness existing between black Americans and Africans. Ewa Luczak’s essay “‘The Quality of Hurt’: African American Writerly Displacement in Europe in the 1960s” resonates with Jerzy Kamionowski’s in that it considers the manner in which African American writers of the 1960s—inspired by the assumption that Blacks born in the United States were part of a larger African diaspora yet rejecting Pan-Africanism’s fundamental essentialism—follow[ed] the path of nostalgic displacement forged by Richard Wright. Living in a decade that called for a radical revisioning of

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Philosophy. New York: Pro- metheus Books. Richards, Janet Radcliffe (2013): The Sceptical Feminist: A Philosophical Enquiry. London: Routledge. Ridout, Alice (2010): Contemporary Women Writers Look Back. London: Continuum. Stone, Alison (2004): Essentialism and Anti-Essentialism in Feminist Theory. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1.2: 135–153. Available at: http://www.sagepub. com/upm-data/4807_MPJ_sample_copy.pdf [date of access: 18.04.2014] Prize Announcement (2007): “The Nobel Prize in Literature 2007 - Prize An- nouncement.” Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2013

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, Coons, Mulattos, Mammies & Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films , Fourth Edition, New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2006. Cripps, Thomas, Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Film, 1900–1942 , New York: Oxford University Press, 1993. Eisler, Garrett “Backstory as Black Story: The Cinematic Reinvention of O’Neill’s The Emperor Jones,” Eugene O’Neill Review , Annual, 2010, Vol. 32, pp. 148–162. Hall, Michael Ra-shon, “The Prominence of the Railroad in the African American Imagination: Mobile Men, Gendered Mobility and the

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(January 1999): 109–126. 4 Julianna Barr, “From Captives to Slaves: Commodifying Indian Women in the Borderlands.” Journal of American History 92 (June 2005): 19–46. Allan Gallay, The Indian Slave Trade (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002). 5 See Barbara Olexer, The Enslavement of the American Indian in Colonial Times (Columbia: Joyous Publications, 2005; reprint, Barbara Olexer, The Enslavement of the American Indian, Library Research Associates, Publishers: Monroe, New York, 1982). 6 See Jack D. Forbes, Africans and Native Americans. The Language of Race and

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Renaissance writers as well as an examination of the positive and negative aspects of city life. Micheaux’s project of representing the issues that were central to black urban life serves as a historical link to two later movements within African American film production: black action films (blaxploitation) and the L.A. school of black filmmakers. The black action film genre of the early 1970s, like Micheaux’ s films, incorporated subject matter and thematic concerns in which inner-city impoverishment and crime acted as primary conditions for the narratives. Situated in the

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African masculinities are currently constructed in a societal space harbouring promises for change, as well as the continued enactment of oppressive violence towards women and Others, in particular in relation to issues regarding race and dissident sexualities. 10 Thus, the South African context, much like elsewhere in the postcolonial world, is one where the study of men and masculinities figures in an increasingly prominent way, illustrating how the possibilities of change towards more democratic notions, in terms of gender relations, has been one of the principal

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-52. Bost, Suzanne. Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000. Athens, GA: U of Georgia P, 2003. Colleran, Jeanne. “South African Theatre in the United States: the allure of the familiar and the exotic.” Ed. Derek Attridge and Rosemary Jolly. Writing South Africa. 221-38. A Coloured Place. By Malika Ndlovu (Lueen Conning). Dir. Malika Ndvolu (Lueen Conning). Perf. Chantal Snyman. Durban, SA, Southern Life Playhouse Company Women’s Arts Festival at the Playhouse. 1996. DaCosta, Kimberly. Making Multiracials: State, Family

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.5 (2007): 56–61. Print. –. “Malouf’s An Imaginary Life .” Rev. of An Imaginary Life . The Commonwealth-Review 2.1 (1990–91): 212–35. Print. –. “Redefining Frontiers - ‘Race,’ Colonizers and the Colonized.” Antipodes 8.2 (1994): 93–100. Print. Braendlin, Bonnie Hoover. “ Bildung in Ethnic Women Writers.” Denver Quarterly 17 (Winter 1983): 75–87. Print. Breytenbach, Breyten. Dogheart: A Memoir . New York: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1999. Print. –. “Vulture Culture: The Alienation of White South Africa.” Apartheid: A Collection of Writings on South African Racism

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compatibly with European languages to produce musical qualities in Western-inspired poetry and prose, it is impossible to ‘add’ jazz to prose or poetry which is created from a stance of music-literature separatism. The African-American writer, Albert Murray, provides an illuminating contrast, describing his autobiography, South to a ← 127 | 128 → Very Old Place, as being “organised like a jazz composition”, containing elements “take you back home to Alabama”. 432 Maran, too, refuses the separation of his ‘exotic’ subject and his literary undertaking. The West’s music