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Gilby (Bartholomew Rose) draws on outdated racist and sexist under- standings that connected black people and women via their suppos- edly uncontrollable sexuality, to advise Danny that Thandiwe, being African and a female, may expect sexual intercourse early in the rela- tionship.35 Gilby tells Danny: ‘I know body language and hers says “give me”. They can be pretty desperate these black women.’ Mean- while some of the staff of the girls school display similar racist stereo- types as Gilby. While never actually catching the teachers at either school in the act of

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young, particularly about communal values and to instill a sense of commitment to the collective. Mutuality, as an Indigenous characteris- tic, was always demonstrated. (Elabor-Idemudia, 2000). In the African context, communities are ‘held together by [the] trinity of closely intertwined forces […] of spirituality, development, and politics [within a worldview which supported] harmony and bal- ance with all existence’ (Wangoola, 2000, p. 270). Traditionally, the power in the community is ‘exercised by wise women and men’ (Wangoola, 2000, p. 271) and, the honour

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African American high school girls in a pre- dominantly white British Literature class used silence to reaffirm their identities as African American women. While some researchers view silence as an absence, Carter sees silence as a repository of resources for critical meaning-making, and she has analyzed the rich, complex, and complicated meanings of the girls’ silences. In so doing, she, in effect, gives voice to the silent focal students and makes visible their critical literacies. If we define critical literacy as the display of knowledge that involves

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-made satellite . This kindled broad fears that the United States had fallen behind the Soviets in both science and education . Congress subsequently ap- proved, and President Eisenhower signed into law the National Defense Education Act, the most comprehensive education legislation in the nation’s history . It increased federal spending on education fivefold .44 While Callahan continued his research and writing, ever-increasing numbers of U .S . ad- visors were being sent to South Vietnam . African Americans conducted a historic sit-in at a segregated Woolworth’s lunch

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knowledge for the classroom (pp. 247–252). Cape Town, South Africa: Oxford University Press. Greeley, A. M. (1992). A modest proposal for the reform of Catholic schools. America, 166(10), 234–238. Jansen, J. (2009). Knowledge in the blood. Confronting race and the apartheid past. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press. Joseph, P. B., & Efron, S. E. (2005, March). Seven worlds of moral education. Phi Delta Kappan, 525–533. Korczak, J. (2001). Selected writings of Janusz Korczak – the educator of educators. Dialogue and Universalism, 9/10, 47–73. Marais, G., & Van

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. Political Behavior, 19, 317–335. Courchene, T. J. (1995). Glocalization: The regional/international interface. Canadian Journal of Regional Science, 18(1), 1–20. Cunningham, W. G., & Gresso, D. W. (1993). Cultural leadership: The culture of excellence in education. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Dantley, M. E. (2005). African American spirituality and Cornel West’s notions of prophetic pragmatism: Restructuring educational leadership in American urban schools. Educational Administration Quarterly, 41(4), 651–674. Deal, T. E., & Kennedy, A. A. (1982

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) written by Nicholas Wade, a leading New York Times science writer (Rendall, 2014). While we study the ways in which many groups of people suffer from racist ideologies, we also focus specifically on African American and Native American experiences, since they continue to be groups heavily impacted by racial mi- croaggressions, deficit thinking, and disproportionate rates of incarceration and violence. One revealing activity we do in class involves going online to eBay. com and searching “collectable Americana.” Every time we have visited this website, we have found

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Jovanovich Day, M, & Hurwitz, A (2011) Children and their art: Art education for elementary and middle schools (9th ed) Boston, MA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning Farrell, A E (2011) Fat shame: Stigma and the fat body in American culture New York, NY: New York University Press Freire, P (1990) Pedagogy of the oppressed New York, NY: Continuum Foucault, M (1977) Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison New York, NY: Vintage Gaitskell, C D, & Gaitskell, M R (1954) Art education during adolescence Toronto, ON, Canada: Ryerson Press Gard, M, & Wright, J (2005) The obesity

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in every 3 African American men can expect to spend some time incarcerated, on pro- bation, or under some type of jurisdiction of the penal system during his lifetime (Howard, 2008). These statistics paint a picture of the failed educational practices and social policies and set the stage for the work needed to counteract the impact of these lived realities faced by young men of color (Sawyer, 2012). The Path to Prison: School to Prison Pipeline The [school to prison] pipeline is so named because it appears actively to collect school-aged youth and funnel them

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versed in writing strategies, she had never worked on a project where students, in the end, •STUDENTS FINDING THEIR VOICE FOR CHANGE• 203 would be authors of a published book. This, she recalls, made her a bit nerv- ous. However, throughout discussions with workshop consultants, Ms. Sampson brainstormed possible writing ideas to introduce at the beginning of the year to students in both her ninth-grade English classes and those enrolled in her African American literature course. She eventually decided to challenge her students to write a book about themselves