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Dangerous Discourses

Feminism, Gun Violence, and Civic Life

Edited By Catherine R. Squires

Dangerous Discourses brings together new work by feminist scholars who provide a multifaceted view of the ways contemporary media discourses inscribe particular understandings of gendered social identities, gun violence, and public policy.
The chapters examine multiple media locations where discourses about guns and violence against women proliferate, including social media, mainstream news, National Rifle Association-sponsored magazines, gun research, public policy debates, popular magazines, and television drama. 
Utilizing theory and empirical research, this book helps us see more clearly how gender, sexuality, and other intersecting identities must be included in analysis of media discourses of guns and gendered violence.  The authors discuss the role of patriarchal ideologies, and center feminist thought and concerns in order to get beyond the one-liners, sound bites, and truisms about bad guys, the Second Amendment, mental health, and personal freedom that currently dominate public debates about guns and violence. 
With its unique views on the ways gun violence and gender inflect each other in the United States, this book is designed for courses in media studies, women’s studies, and sociology.
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Contributors

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Ruth DeFoster earned her Ph.D. in Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on media coverage of violence, terrorism, mass shootings, and racial and religious identities. She has published articles on news media, press coverage of terrorism, and media depictions of gun violence in the Journal of Communication Inquiry, Communication, Culture & Critique, and Newspaper Research Journal. She currently teaches at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Gayatri Devi is Associate Professor of English at Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania. Her articles and essays on women’s studies and gender issues, and South Asian and Middle Eastern literatures and films have appeared in select scholarly journals and books. Her co-edited volume Humor in Middle Eastern Cinema (Wayne State University Press) explores the aporetic and sublime nature of humor in Middle Eastern films. She serves on the board of the Association for the Study of Women and Mythology (ASWM), and the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Women’s Consortium. She was the recipient of a 2015 Pennsylvania state grant to study domestic violence in the rural counties of the state. ← 257 | 258 →

Rachel Alicia Griffin is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at Southern Illinois University (SIU), cross-appointed in Africana Studies and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Her research interests span Black feminist thought, critical race theory, popular culture, sport, education, and sexual violence. From 2012 to 2015 Dr. Griffin was the Judge William Holmes Cook Professorship at SIU, and...

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