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The Theory of Social Pulsation

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Ivo Komsic

The Theory of Social Pulsation is a new social theory elaborated from the social phenomenology and philosophy of sciences’ standpoint. It represents an innovative interpretation of social phenomena postulated as active states of social actors including individuals, social groups, and social facts (organizations, institutions, systems). As an active state of social actors, pulsation is defined by eight variables that constitute social phenomena as a whole: (a) intention, (b) reaction, (c) reflection, (d) communication, (e) institutionalization, (f) internalization, (g) structuration, and (h) innovation.

Ivo Komsic argues that social states are pulsating and within those states, social causality is transferred from one social actor to another. Social actors continuously transfer social causality from one to another, depending on the intensity of its pulsation. Balanced or unbalanced, functional or dysfunctional, consensual or imposed, a system will be classified in the presence or absence of one of these phenomena, by its greater or lesser intensity. The theory posits a new paradigm that tends to overcome the "eternal" problem in sociology—relations between individuals as social actors and social structure, that is, "social statics" and "social dynamics," the role of the great historical personalities and the "objective law of history," freedom and necessity in social action, micro and macro social levels.

The model of social communication analyzed in the book can be used as a general model of social and political communication, particularly in multiethnic and multicultural societies considering the contemporary state of affairs globally.

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HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

Heresy, Crossroads, and Intersections

Paolo Palmieri, General Editor

This series invites book proposals that include innovative strategies for pursuing history and philosophy of science. Especially welcome are scholarly works using non-analytic philosophical perspectives to successfully bring to bear on our understanding of how scientific practices are related to the humanities and the social sciences. The series also welcomes exploration of the sciences in relation to gender, culture, society, and the intellectual and social contexts that illuminate the places, the structures of origination, and the patterns of development over generations. Approaches may include focused analyses of thinkers from unorthodox perspectives that can shed new light on the history and philosophy of science, such as Montaigne, Bruno, Galileo, Newton, Pascal, Emerson, Thoreau, Nietzsche, Jung, Freud. Proposals aimed at probing the philosophical intersections between the sciences and other societal practices that can be configured as heretic are also encouraged. These might include the emergence of the psychoanalytic movements in the twentieth century, how the fine arts have impinged on the historical processes that gave rise to the sciences over the last few centuries, how in turn the intellectual frameworks inaugurated by the sciences have been imported into the avantgarde movements that paralleled the advent of industrialized societies, and finally how contemporary scientific domains of knowledge reverberate in ‘deviant’ social and artistic practices.

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