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Boondock Kollage

Stories from the Hip Hop South

Series:

Regina N. Bradley

Boondock Kollage: Stories from the Hip Hop South is a collection of twelve short stories that addresses issues of race, place, and identity in the post–Civil Rights American South. Using historical, spectral, and hip hop infused fiction, Boondock Kollage critically engages readers to question the intersections of regionalism and black culture in current American society.

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Chapter 2: Intentions

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INTENTIONS

Albany, Georgia’s Dream Week started in the 1980s as a way to say “thank you” to the men and women who protested on Albany’s behalf during the Civil Rights Movement. Folks wanted to be remembered past Black History Month and, like pretty much everyone else, wanted to have a piece of Dr. King’s legacy. One year, his daughter came on behalf of the King family to the legacy banquet. She didn’t make the front page of the paper but a small picture of Ms. King was on page 3E of the “About Town” section.

Dream Week always happened after Spring Break. All school age kids submitted a project that was appropriate for their grade level. This would be my twelfth Dream project. As a second grader, I wrote a poem “What Civil Rights Means to Me? Thank You.” My teacher and classmates applauded because I made the last two lines rhyme: “Thank you Dr. King. You’re the reason we are still in this thing.” In seventh grade, I submitted a shadow box of Laurie Pritchett throwing people in jail. Laurie Pritchett was the Chief of Police in Albany during the movement. My great aunt Mabel didn’t seem to mind him.

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