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Forgotten Places

Critical Studies in Rural Education

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Edited By William M. Reynolds

Forgotten Places: Critical Studies in Rural Education critically investigates and informs the construction of the rural, rural identity and the understanding of the rural internationally. This book promotes and expands the notion of critical understandings of rural education, particularly in the areas of race, class, gender, and LGBTQ, with conceptualizations of social justice. While there have been many volumes written on critical issues in urban education, only a small number have been produced on rural education, and the majority of those are not critical. By contrast, Forgotten Places not only discusses "schools in the country," but also expands conceptualizations of the rural beyond schools and place as well as beyond the borders of the United States. It also tackles the artificial duality between conceptualizations of urban and rural. Forgotten Places includes scholarly investigations into the connections among the symbolic order, various forms of cultural artifacts and multiple readings of these artifacts within the context of critical/transformational pedagogy. This book fills a significant gap in the scholarly work on the ramifications of the rural.

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Contributors

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Faith Agostinone-Wilson is Professor of Education at Aurora University. She is the author of Dialectical Research Methods in the Classical Marxist Tradition, Marxism and Education beyond Identity: Sexuality and Schooling and co-editor for The Handbook for Undergraduate Research Advisors, along with being published in several journals and edited books. A member of the Rouge Forum educational collective, Faith lives in Waukegan, Illinois and her research interests include education policy, copyleft movement, sexuality, and counter-hegemonic research methodologies. Outside of academic life, Faith knits, sews historical clothing, and works on restoring her Victorian home.

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