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Writing for College and Beyond

Life Lessons from the College Composition Classroom

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CJ Kent

Writing for College and Beyond: Life Lessons from the College Composition Classroom explains how the many skills taught in the Freshman Composition course apply at work and in life. The composition class is a pre-requisite and General Education course for most colleges and universities in the United States. It reaches students in every area of study. As people wonder about the value of a liberal arts education and question whether colleges and universities are truly preparing students for the workforce, Writing for College and Beyond challenges those arguments by pointing out exactly how classroom policies and writing assignments apply beyond school walls. Professors, lecturers, and graduate students teaching Freshman Composition courses will find this book helpful. Administrators who service the Freshman Composition population, such as Writing Center Directors, will also find Writing for College and Beyond: Life Lessons from the College Composition Classroom a wonderful aid.

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Chapter Six: The Argument Essay for a Promotion and Raise

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CHAPTER SIX

The Argument Essay for a Promotion and Raise



An argument provides supporting evidence for your position, acknowledges an alternate point of view, responds to it, and concludes with an overview. You’ve been making arguments since you could speak, but learning the structure will help you make them better. Since arguments provide the reasons you deserve a raise or promotion, they are also invaluable to your future success. Remember that arguments are a way of organizing information and ideas and are not what we commonly mean to describe people yelling, overpowering, or otherwise being forceful. It’s your evidence that should be convincing in a rhetorical argument, not your volume.

You don’t get promoted because you seem nice. You don’t get a raise because you’ve been there for a year or because you need a bigger home for your growing family, want a nicer car, or hope to build your saving account. Those are your problems, not the company’s. You don’t get a raise because you’ve been working long hours. If you can’t get the job done during business hours, employers might think you have a time management problem.

Wanting a promotion or raise won’t get you anywhere.

Proving how valuable you are to the company will get you a lot further.

An argument is not a fight. An argument is a means of persuasion. Arguments are important because they provide the basis...

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