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Internal Migration

Challenges in Governance and Integration

Edited By Shane Joshua Barter and William Ascher

Internal Migration: Challenges in Governance and Integration focuses on the challenges associated with internal migration across the developing world. While international migration captures significant attention, less attention has been paid to those migrating within recognized national borders. The sources of internal migration are not fundamentally different from international migration, as migrants may be pushed by violence, disasters, state policies, or various opportunities. Although they do not cross international borders, they may still cross significant internal borders, with cultural differences and perceived state favoritism generating a potential for "sons of the soil" conflicts. As citizens, internal migrants are in theory to be provided legal protection by host states, however this is not always the case, and sometimes their own states represent the cause of their displacement. The chapters in this book explain how international organizations, host states, and host communities may navigate the many challenges associated with internal migration.

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1. Internal Migration: Challenges in Governance & Integration (Shane Joshua Barter / William Ascher)

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1. Internal Migration: Challenges in Governance & Integration

Shane Joshua Barter

Soka University of America

William Ascher

Claremont McKenna College

Considerable policy and media attention is paid to migration across borders, and for good reason. International migrants may seek safety (including Syrian refugees, Vietnamese boat people, Rohingya refugees from Burma, and Cuban exiles), a better life (i.e., Turks in Germany, Mexicans in the United States, and Algerians in Italy), or may relocate for a variety of other reasons. When migration crosses borders, it involves multiple governments, cultural adaptation, and sometimes hostility from host societies. While international migration captures significant attention, less attention has been paid to those migrating within recognized national borders. This is despite internal migrants being far more numerous than international migrants and the fact that many international migrants begin as internal migrants. The sources of internal migration are not fundamentally different from international migration, as migrants may be pushed by violence, disasters, or state policies, or pulled by various opportunities. Although they do not cross international borders, they may still cross significant internal borders, finding themselves in alien cultural environments. As citizens, internal migrants are in theory to be provided legal protection by host states, however, this is not always the case, and sometimes host governments are the cause of their displacement.

This collection seeks to better understand the dilemmas faced by migrants who do not cross international borders and who possess some...

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