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Regional Discourses on Society and History

Shaping the Caribbean

Edited By Jerome Teelucksingh and Shane Pantin

This book thematically analyses and surveys areas of Caribbean history and society. The work is divided into three parts: part one addresses migration and identity; part two explores policy and development; and part three explores music and literature. The volume places a fresh perspective on these topics. The essays depart from the usual broader themes of politics, economics and society and provide a deeper insight into forces that left a decisive legacy on aspects of the Caribbean region. Such contributions come at a time when some of the Caribbean territories are marking over 50 years as independent nation states and attempting to create, understand and forge ways of dealing with critical national and regional issues. The volume brings together a broad group of scholars writing on Caribbean issues including postgraduate students, lecturers, and researchers. Each chapter is thematically divided into the aforementioned areas. This book addresses areas much deeper than the linear historical and social science models, and it offers Caribbean academics and researchers a foundation for further research.

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2. The Migration of West Indian Women from the Caribbean Community to the Eastern Seaboard of the United States of America from the 1960s to the 1990s: A Coping Strategy (Ronald C. Noel)

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2. The Migration of West Indian Women from the Caribbean Community to the Eastern Seaboard of the United States of America from the 1960s to the 1990s: A Coping Strategy

Ronald C. Noel

West Indian women who reside in countries that comprise the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) are migrating in greater numbers than their male counterparts to the eastern seaboard of the United States of America (United States) at the earliest opportunity. Aubrey W. Bonnet observed that between 1972 and 1979 fifty-one percent (51%) of those who emigrated from islands such as Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Kitts/Nevis and Antigua were women.1 Bonham C. Richardson noted that in the later part of the twentieth century, both sexes emigrated in roughly equal numbers.2 This demographic in the pattern of migration from West Indian island has been observed from the 1960s, particularly in Trinidad and Tobago. Data from the Central Statistical Office (CSO) for the first half of 1967 showed that 1,030 persons left the country permanently.3 Out of this figure 670 were women. A further 220 individuals departed as temporary emigrants which meant that they would be away for one to three years. The number of women who left among the 220 individuals was 150. The data revealed that the emigrants left for such destinations as the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and the Caribbean.

The United States was the target destination for the majority of emigrants and temporary...

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