Show Less

Preventing Violence and Achieving World Peace

The Contributions of the Gülen Movement

Series:

Edited By Ori Z. Soltes and Margaret A. Johnson

How can we address the seemingly endless conflicts in the world, particularly those arising from misunderstandings of Islam by both Muslims and non-Muslims? Preventing Violence and Achieving World Peace: The Contributions of the Gülen Movement presents the essays of eight scholars who consider the diverse ways in which the Gülen Movement or hizmet («service to others») – inspired by contemporary Turkish social philosopher Fetullah Gülen – has worked to answer this question. Drawing from various intellectual and theological sources, particularly Sufism, these essays indicate multiple instances of positive interfaith and/or multicultural dialogue. In addition, they consider how the writings of Gülen and the works of the Gülen Movement, through an extensive program of education and communication, have contributed significantly to efforts that oppose violence and shape universal peace.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Chapter 7: Universalism in the Thought of Rumi, Kabir, Abulafia, Luria, and Merton; and the Implications for the Gülen Movement, Violence and Peace Ori Z. Soltes 115

Extract

• C H A P T E R S E V E N • Universalism in the Thought of Rumi, Kabir, Abulafia, Luria, and Merton; and the Implications for the Gülen Movement, Violence and Peace Ori Z. Soltes ysticism within the Abrahamic faiths—Judaism, Christianity and Islam—is built on paradox. Mystics believe that there is a deeper, more hidden recess within Divinity—the mysterion1—than that which is the focus of non-mystical religion, and that, by a given methodology, one can access that innermost, deepest recess. Yet, the basic understanding of God within the Abrahamic traditions is that of an endless, all-encompassing Being without contours in time and space that would permit a concept of inner or outer, or deeper or shallower—at least not as we use these terms in the everyday sense. We might expect and find certain parallels and overlaps among the Abrahamic mystical traditions as we do among their general traditions, consonant with the common roots of all three expressions of faith. We might also expect and find divergences reflecting the historical and conceptual fact that the three are not identical to each other in important ways2—in both their general and their mystical traditions. One might suppose that no Jewish mystic could possibly think in universalistic terms, given the Jewish mystical sense of the impossibility of accessing God’s hiddenness without the instrumentation of the Torah—and without the agency of Hebrew, the original language of the Torah, and the M • ORI Z. SOLTES • 116 ability...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.