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Produsing Theory in a Digital World 2.0

The Intersection of Audiences and Production in Contemporary Theory – Volume 2

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Edited By Rebecca Ann Lind

Continuing the explorations begun in the first Produsing Theory volume, this book provides a site at which varied theories – some still emerging – can intersect and shine a light into the spaces between what previously had been neatly separated and discrete components of media systems. In some settings, division by audience, content, and production settings remains useful, but this volume, like the first, is all about the interstices.
Contributors reflect varied perspectives in their approaches to the spaces formed as a result of rapidly developing and swiftly deploying new communications technologies and social software. They shine multiple spotlights into the intersection of audiences and production, providing a guide toward a nuanced understanding of the interstitial spaces.

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Chapter Fourteen: Engaging Adolescents in Narrative Research and Interventions on Cyberbullying (Heidi Vandebosch, Philippe C. G. Adam, Kath Albury, Sara Bastiaensens, John de Wit, Stephanie Hemelryk Donald, Kathleen Van Royen, Anne Vermeulen)

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 C H A P T E R F O U R T E E N  Engaging Adolescents in Narrative Research and Interventions on Cyberbullying Heidi Vandebosch, Philippe C. G. Adam, Kath Albury, Sara Bastiaensens, John de Wit, Stephanie Hemelryk Donald, Kathleen Van Royen, and Anne Vermeulen “A few years ago . . . . It was the whole class against one person . . . . And then we made a website . . . . And that girl . . . . She talked strangely. She was annoying. And her knees looked orange . . . . And we named her ‘the carrot’ . . . . And then we made a website . . . with pictures of her . . . ‘the walking carrot’ . . . (laughs)” (girl, 17 years old). (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2008a, p. 22) everal large-scale studies in the United States (Madden et al., 2013), Europe (Hasebrink, Livingstone, & Haddon, 2008), and Australia (Green, Brady, Ólafsson, Hartley, & Lumby, 2011) show that information and communication technologies (ICTs) provide adolescents with a range of opportunities for learning and for increasing creativity, social contacts, and civic engagement. These studies, however, illustrate that computers, mobile phones, and the Internet also present various types of risks. In this chapter, we focus on cyberbullying, a specific type of aggression occurring in online interaction, which can involve adolescents as victim, perpetrator, or bystander. Cyberbullying has been associated with negative health outcomes. Studies have shown, for instance, that cyberbullying victims experience increased levels of emotional distress (e.g., Mishna, Khoury-Kassabri, Gadalla, & Daciuk, 2012; Şahin, 2012; Šléglová & Černá, 2011), depression (e.g., Kowalski & Fedina, 2011; Machmutow, Perren, Sticca, & Alsaker, 2012; Schneider, O’Donnell, Stueve, & Coulter, 2012), and anxiety...

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