Show Less
Restricted access

We Got Next

Urban Education and the Next Generation of Black Teachers

Series:

Lynnette Mawhinney

Developing a more culturally diverse teaching force is one of the most important tasks facing the education system in the United States. Yet, in the midst of this challenge, little is known about who these teachers might be or where they might come from. We Got Next: Urban Education and the Next Generation of Black Teachers illustrates the journeys that Black pre-service teachers travel in their attempts to become educators. By looking at their educational life histories – their schooling experiences, teaching philosophies, and personal motivation – this book discovers what compels them to become teachers and the struggles and successes they encounter along the way. With texture and care, We Got Next helps professionals, policymakers, and teacher educators to understand what draws young African Americans toward the teaching profession and how to help them get there.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Notes

← 130 | 131 → NOTES

Extract

1.Please note that African American and Black are used interchangeably.

2.All names and places are pseudonyms to ensure anonymity.

3.Note that this figure was often reported high, as the requirements for academic probation were often lowered. Thus, most Carver students who failed almost all their classes were often “retained” for the following year.

4.The teaching certification guidelines were outlined by the state. But often when students called the state to get permission to student teach because they did not pass the basic skills exam by one point, the state would deny that they were the ones to outline the certification guidelines and blame that teacher education program, which was just following the state’s laws.

5.Boys to Men is a mentoring program one of our upper-level secondary education majors established. The program is for upper-level men at Carver to help mentor incoming freshman males in Carver, to create well-rounded and successful Black men. Each mentor has one to two mentees they support throughout the school year. Also, the Boys to Men group would do programming and outreach to Black boys in local schools. Allen was a mentee in the group.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.