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Recalling the Celtic Tiger

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Edited By Eamon Maher, Eugene O'Brien and Brian Lucey

This book looks at various effects, symptoms and consequences of the period in Irish culture known as the Celtic Tiger. It will trace the critical pathway from boom to bust – and up to the current beginnings of a similar, smaller boom – through events, personalities and products. The short entries offer a sense of the lived experience of this seismic period in contemporary Irish society.

While clearly not all aspects of the period could realistically be covered, the book does contain essential information about the central actors, events, themes, and economic trends, which are discussed in a readable and accessible manner. Each entry is linked to the overall Celtic Tiger phenomenon and its immediate aftermath.

The book also provides a comprehensive account of what happened in this period and will be a factual resource for anyone anxious to discover information on the areas most commonly connected to it. All entries are written by experts in the area. The contributors include broadcasters, economists, cultural theorists, sociologists, literary critics, journalists, politicians and writers, each of whom brings particular insights to some aspect of the Celtic Tiger.

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Short Selling (Shaen Corbet)

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Shaen Corbet

Short Selling

While stock markets, housing markets and pretty much all other types of markets continued to appreciate substantially throughout the Celtic Tiger period, few investors considered mechanisms through which one could profit from falling prices. The practice of short selling is best described as an investment or trading strategy that speculates on the decline in a stock or other securities price. It is an advanced strategy that is advised to be undertaken only by experienced traders and investors.

Short selling is a very suitable as a tool to speculate on an impending fall in value, and investors or portfolio managers may use it as a hedge against the downside risk of a long position in the same security, or a related one. Hedging is a more common transaction involving placing an offsetting position to reduce risk exposure. In short selling, a position is opened by borrowing shares of a stock or other asset that the investor believes will decrease in value by a set future date, known as the expiration date. The investor then sells these borrowed shares to buyers willing to pay the market price. Before the borrowed shares must be returned, the trader is betting that the price will continue to decline and they can purchase them at a lower cost. The risk of loss on a short sale is theoretically unlimited since the price of any asset can climb to infinity.

Also, short-selling stocks require a...

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