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Dimensions of Cultural Security for National and Linguistic Minorities

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Edited By Jean-Rémi Carbonneau, Fabian Jacobs and Ines Keller

Cultural security is a basic need for individuals belonging to national and linguistic minorities. Structurally exposed to asymmetric power dynamics, these minorities compete with the larger society for material and non-material resources, rendering their future perspectives particularly precarious. This book brings researchers from different social sciences together to examine the notion of cultural security and its meaning for different national and linguistic minorities through multiple case studies in Europe, Asia, North and South America. The cultural security of these minorities comprises various dimensions, including institutional and territorial arrangements, state stability, as well as different patterns of citizen belonging and participation. Through the prism of these dimensions, the contributors to this book present a variety of strategies of cultural resilience, societal structures and institutional frameworks allowing national and linguistic minorities to secure a certain degree of cultural autonomy and develop a sense of belonging to their respective states. Cultural security is an inescapable condition for the fair and sustained development of both minorities and majorities in today’s societies characterized by deep diversity.

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Introduction: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Cultural Security in Minority Studies

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Introduction

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Cultural Security in Minority Studies

JEAN-RÉMI CARBONNEAU, ANDREAS GRUSCHKE (†),1 FABIAN JACOBS AND INES KELLER

This volume arose from the international symposium Dimensions of Cultural Security for Ethnic and Linguistic Minorities that took place on November 17–19, 2016 in Bautzen/Budyšin in the Free State of Saxony. The symposium held in the House of the Sorbs (Serbski Dom) was jointly organized by the Sorbian Institute (Serbski institut), the Canada Research Chair in Quebec and Canadian Studies (CRÉQC) at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM) and the Institute of Social Development & Western China Development Studies at the Sichuan University in Chengdu, China. At the same time, the conference was the second meeting of the International Symposia on Cultural Inclusion, held for the first time in 2015 in Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). More than twenty social scientists from different disciplines (political and cultural sciences, history, anthropology, sociolinguistics, geography) met for three days in Bautzen to incite discussion on a variety of societal structures and institutional frameworks allowing national and linguistic minorities to develop a sense of belonging to their respective state through political participation and, thus, secure a certain degree of cultural autonomy. This would guarantee – such was the assumption of the organizers – social stability and the sustained development of both minorities and majorities.

Saxony’s Secretary of State for Science and Arts, Uwe Gaul, opened the symposium staged under the auspices of State...

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