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Schooling and Education in Lebanon

Syrian and Syrian Palestinian Refugees Inside and Outside the Camps

Nina Maadad and Grant Rodwell

This book provides insights into the education and schooling of Syrian and Palestinian Syrian children inside and outside Lebanese refugee camps. It describes what is happening to these children and young refugees in terms of their schooling. Investigating the perspectives of children, their parents, teachers, community leaders, and state politicians and bureaucrats on the schooling provisions and educational opportunities for refugee children in Lebanon, this book reveals the condition of social disadvantage that Syrian and Syrian Palestinian refugee children and their families are experiencing in Lebanon. Maadad and Rodwell propose the idea of the pedagogy of the displaced that recognises socio-economic disadvantage and refocuses the nature of the learner and their learning and the philosophy of teaching. A collaborative action of society – the refugee families, the schools, the communities, the host state, the international aid agencies and the rest of the world – in addressing the barriers to education and schooling of the refugee children must break ground and be sustained.

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Dedication

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The authors would like to dedicate this book to all those displaced children, their parents and teachers in scattered refugee camps throughout the world.

Our responsibility and duty as parents and carers is to provide the best education for our children, love and protect them, but also to give them the freedom and stability that allows them to have a normal childhood and to dream of their future, a future they create for themselves so they can live their lives as we did before them. Nothing says it better than the renowned words of wisdom recorded by the famous Lebanese poet and writer Gibran Khalil Gibran in his book, The Prophet:

Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of life’s longing for itself. They come through you but not from you, and though they are with you yet they belong not to you … (Gibran Khalil Gibran, 1923). ← 7 | 8 →

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