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Internationalisation and Transnationalisation in Higher Education

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Edited By Vesa Korhonen and Pauliina Alenius

Internationalisation have recently featured in discussions and initiatives related to various fields of higher education. Educational leaders, institutions and national policy-makers, but also international actors, such as the European Union and UNESCO, have promoted the internationalisation of higher education. Increasing emphasis on internationalisation has diversified also teaching and learning contexts in higher education and has given rise to a growing need for searching appropriate cross-cultural pedagogical approaches. However, internationalisation in the context of higher education is a multifaceted concept and involves more than just one international dimension in institutional or pedagogical activities. These recent developmental features are examined in the book with the conceptual lense of emerging pattern of internationalisation.

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1. The ethical implications of internationalisation for a knowledge economy: A critical discourse analysis approach to contemporary strategies in Finland and Canada (Jani Haapakoski / Sharon Stein)

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JANI HAAPAKOSKI & SHARON STEIN

1.  The ethical implications of internationalisation for a knowledge economy: A critical discourse analysis approach to contemporary strategies in Finland and Canada

Abstract: Internationalisation of higher education has within the three decades become a strategic focus of universities worldwide. In this chapter, we take a Critical Discourse Analysis approach towards contemporary internationalisation strategies in Finland and Canada to examine how they frame the role of higher education, and consider the ethical implications of these framings. We find that both documents largely naturalise the role of higher education and internationalisation in the service of a knowledge economy, and uncritically reproduce global power inequities and Western supremacy in ways that narrow possibilities for ethical engagement. We also find that the Canadian strategy is less ambiguous in its commercialised aims, while the Finnish document contains a mixture of social and economic rationales for internationalisation. We suggest that these spaces of discursive ambiguity point to distinct models of internationalisation, and argue for the importance of scholarly spaces that support open and critical inquiry about the implications and ethical commitments of these different models.

Introduction

Internationalisation has within the three decades changed from ad hoc activities to a strategic focus in Higher Education (HE) worldwide, in part as a response to the changing contexts facilitated by globalisation (Knight, 2014). In addition to becoming more structured, internationalisation has also changed in terms of approaches and values. Post-World War II...

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