Show Less

The Logic of Cultures

Three Structures of Philosophical Thought

Series:

Paul Taborsky

This book proposes to identify three long-term structures in causal reasoning – in particular, in terms of the relationship between cause and identity – that appear to be of value in categorizing and organizing various trends in philosophical thought.
Such conceptual schemes involve a host of philosophical dilemmas (such as the problem of relativism), which are examined in the first chapter. A number of naturalistic and transcendental approaches to this problem are also analysed.
In particular, the book attempts to construct a theoretical basis for Foucault’s tripartite classification of epistemological structures in European thought.
The final chapter attempts to buttress the above schema by extending the analysis from cause and identity to growth, change, and stability, critiquing certain ideas of Foucault and Heidegger, as well as examining the contemporary thought of process philosophy and complexity theory.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Contents

Extract

Introduction .......................................................................................... 1 Plurality and Causality ............................................................... 1 Overview: Three Patterns of Causal Interaction ........................ 5 1. What is a paradigm? ....................................................................... 13 2. Paradigms and Causal Structure ..................................................... 55 The Symbolic System ............................................................... 55 The Structure of Causality in the Symbolic Paradigm ..... 55 The Causal system .................................................................... 72 Ontological Indifference ................................................... 73 Universality and Mathesis Universalis ............................. 77 Temporality and Visibility ................................................ 95 Classical and Modern Probability Theory ..................... 106 The Existential/Environmental Paradigm ............................... 122 The ‘Environment’ and Non-Monoticity ......................... 124 The Marburg School and the Limit Concept — Foucault’s Concept of ‘Man’— Duality ......................... 133 Philosophy of Science in the Late Nineteenth Century ... 162 3. Stability, Growth and Decline ...................................................... 187 A Dynamic Model .................................................................. 191 Causality, Order and Growth: Foucault and the birth of the clinic .............................................................. 201 viii Process, Growth, and Complexity .......................................... 209 Process and Growth ....................................................... 209 Complexity and Self-Organization ................................. 234 The Arrow of Time .......................................................... 238 Time and History .................................................................... 249 References ........................................................................................ 259 Index…. ............................................................................................ 265

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.