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European Union Foreign Policy and the Global Climate Regime

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Simon Schunz

Ever since the first international negotiations on climate change in the early 1990s, the European Union has aspired to play a leading role in global climate politics.
This book engages in a longitudinal analysis of the EU’s participation in and impact on the United Nations climate regime.
It provides not only comprehensive insights into the evolution of EU foreign climate policy, but also a thought-provoking audit of the potential and limits of the EU’s influence in a major domain of global affairs.
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← 6 | 7 →Contents

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Foreword and Acknowledgements

INTRODUCTION. Rationale of the Study

The EU, Climate Change and Global Climate Politics

The Structure of the Study

CHAPTER 1. Analytical Framework: Studying the European Union’s Influence on the Global Climate Regime

Building the Key Concepts: Influence Attempts and Influence

Setting the Theoretical Scene: Insights from EU Foreign Policy Analysis and Regime Theory

Methodological Bases: Analysing and Determining Influence

CHAPTER 2. Historical Foundations (1980s–1995): EU Influence on the Set-up of the Global Climate Regime

The Pre-negotiation Phase: From Scientific Circles to First Political Negotiations

The EU’s Influence on the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1991–1992)

The Road to COP 1 (1992–1995)

CHAPTER 3. From the Berlin Mandate to the Kyoto Protocol (1995–1997): EU Influence on the First Development of the Global Climate Regime

The Context: Major Developments in Global Politics and Climate Science

Key Actors in the Global Climate Regime and their Positions

The Negotiation Process and the EU’s Influence Attempts

The Outcome: the Kyoto Protocol

The EU’s Influence Attempts: Extracting Patterns

← 7 | 8 →The EU’s Influence in the Kyoto Protocol Negotiations

Explaining the EU’s Influence during the Period 1995 to 1997

CHAPTER 4. From the Buenos Aires Action Plan to the Year 2007 (1998–2007): EU Influence on the Consolidation of the Global Climate Regime

COP 4 to COP 7: From the Buenos Aires Action Plan to the Marrakech Accords (1998–2001)

After the Marrakech Accords: Ensuring Ratification of the Kyoto Protocol (2002–2004)

Towards a Post-2012 Regime: Loose Talks on the Way to Bali (2005–2007)

Determining and Explaining the EU’s Influence during the Period 1998 to 2007

CHAPTER 5. From the Bali Roadmap to the Copenhagen Accord (2007–2009): EU Influence on the Post-2012 Global Climate Negotiations

The Context: Major Developments in Global Politics and Climate Science

Key Actors in the Global Climate Regime and their Positions

The Negotiation Process and the EU’s Influence Attempts

The Outcome: the Copenhagen Accord

The EU’s Influence Attempts: Extracting Patterns

The EU’s Influence in the Post-2012 Climate Negotiations until 2009

Explaining the EU’s Influence during the Period 2007 to 2009

CHAPTER 6. Gradually “Back on Track” (2010–2012): EU Influence on the Resumed Post-2012 Global Climate Negotiations

The Context: Major Developments in Global Politics and Climate Science

Key Actors in the Global Climate Regime and their Positions

The Negotiation Process and the EU’s Influence Attempts

← 8 | 9 →The Outcomes: the Cancun Agreements, the Durban Package and the Doha Gateway

Determining and Explaining the EU’s Influence during the Period 2010 to 2012

CHAPTER 7. Explaining EU Influence on the Global Climate Regime

Patterns of EU Influence across Time

Comparing EU Influence Attempts to its Actual Influence: the “Goodness of Fit” Puzzle

Determinants of EU Influence over Time: Propositions on Causal Mechanisms and their Scope Conditions

Conclusion

Major Findings of the Study and their Significance

Research and Normative Implications of the Study

References

Annexes

Index

Tables

Table 1: Toward a Typology of Influence

Table 2: How the EU Can Exert Influence – EU Foreign Policy Acts

Table 3: Establishing EU Influence – Constitutive Dimensions

Table 4: The Negotiations of the Copenhagen Accord

Table 5: EU Influence on the Global Climate Regime over Time

Table 6: EU Influence Attempts and their Success in the Global Climate Regime (1991-2012) – a Compilation of Instruments← 9 | 10 →