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The Doppelgänger

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Edited By Deborah Ascher Barnstone

The Doppelgänger – the double, twin, mirror image or alter ego of someone else – is an ancient and universal theme that can be traced at least as far back as Greek and Roman mythology, but is particularly associated with two areas of study: psychology, and German literature and culture since the Romantic movement. Although German language literature has been a nexus for writing on the Doppelgänger, there is a paucity of scholarly work treating a broader selection of cultural products from the German-speaking world. The essays in this volume explore the phenomenon of the double in multiple aspects of German visual culture, from traditional art forms like painting and classical ballet to more contemporary ones like film, photography and material culture, and even puppet theatre. New ways of understanding the Doppelgänger emerge from analyses of various media and time periods, such as the theme of the double in a series of portraits by Egon Schiele, the doubling of silk by rayon in Weimar Germany and its implications for class distinctions in Germany, and the use of the x-ray as a form of double in Thomas Mann’s Magic Mountain and Christoph Schlingensief’s performance art.
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GERMAN VISUAL CULTURE

SERIES EDITORS

Professor Deborah Ascher Barnstone (University of Technology Sydney, Australia) Professor Thomas O. Haakenson (California College of the Arts, USA)

German Visual Culture offers an innovative approach to German Studies within the diverse and growing field of Visual Culture. The series invites scholarship by artists, designers, academics and curators across all media forms and time periods. It engages with traditional art historical methods as well as inventive interdisciplinary ones, recognizing the scholarly merits of both. Of particular interest are provocative perspectives on archival materials, original scholarship on emerging and established visual forms, and new readings of history through the lens of visual culture. The series offers a much-needed venue for expanding how we engage with the field of Visual Culture in general.

The series is the publishing project of the Visual Culture Network (VCN) for the German Studies Association in the United States. Proposals for revised dissertations, monographs and edited volumes from a wide range of comparative, theoretical and methodological perspectives are welcome. Prospective authors are encouraged to submit proposals on any aspect of German Visual Culture, including projects that address such themes as new media, intermediality, gender, identity, memory, nostalgia, spectacle, trauma, the double, East/West, dissent and fetishism. We publish in both English and German.

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