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Queering Paradigms V

Queering Narratives of Modernity

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Edited By María Amelia Viteri and Manuela Lavinas Picq

The authors of this edited volume use a queer perspective to address colonialism as localized in the Global South, to analyse how the queer can be decolonized and to map the implications of such conversations on hegemonic and alternative understandings of modernity. This book is distinct in at least four ways. First, its content is a rare blend of original scholarly pieces with internationally acclaimed art. Second, it is a volume that blends theoretical debates with policy praxis, filling a gap that often tends to undermine the reach of either side at play. Third, its topic is unique, as sexual politics are put in direct dialogue with post-colonial debates. Fourth, the book brings to the forefront voices from the Global South/non-core to redefine a field that has been largely framed and conceptualized in the Global North/core.
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Elizabeth Sara Lewis - Pegging, masculinities and heterosexualities: How narratives of men who enjoy being penetrated by women can contribute to social transformation and to queering the hidden homosexual norm in Queer Studies

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ELIZABETH SARA LEWIS

Pegging, masculinities and heterosexualities: How narratives of men who enjoy being penetrated by women can contribute to social transformation and to queering the hidden homosexual norm in Queer Studies

Introduction: Stories of pegging

On May 17th, 2001, at the end of his weekly column about sex and relationship advice in the US newspaper The Stranger, North American journalist Dan Savage asked, ‘What should we call it when a woman fucks a man in the ass with a strap-on dildo?’ The following week, in his May 24th column titled ‘Let’s Vote!’, Savage, after having rejected several suggestions, invited his readers to vote for one of three remaining terms via email. The options were: (1) to bob, an allusion to a series of videos known as Bend Over Boyfriend (B.O.B.), which show the aforementioned sexual practice without giving it a specific name; (2) to punt, normally referring either to a manner of kicking a ball or, in nautical terms, a way of propelling a boat with a pole; and (3) to peg, inspired from stories about British male prostitutes inserting wooden pegs into their anuses in order to remain dilated between clients. Savage originally rejected this last term due to his doubts about the veracity of the story and in order not to offend his aunt, named Peg; however, he eventually threw it into the mix due to its brevity and percussive sonority. Approximately one month later, in...

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