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Phonology, its Faces and Interfaces

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Edited By Jolanta Szpyra-Kozłowska and Eugeniusz Cyran

The papers collected in this volume examine selected aspects of the interaction of phonology with phonetics, morphosyntax and the lexicon in a variety of languages including Korean, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, British English, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Dutch and Hawaiian. In order to approach the role and ways of expressing extraphonological information in phonology, the international contributors adopt different methods of analysis (data gathering, experiments, theoretical discussions), couched in various theoretical frameworks (such as Optimality Theory and Government Phonology), which reveal both the multifarious faces and interfaces of modern phonological research.

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Phonotactic adaptation of English loanwords in Hawaiian – a Government Phonology approach to consonant cluster decomposition (Krzysztof Jaskuła)

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Krzysztof Jaskuła

Phonotactic adaptation of English loanwords in Hawaiian – a Government Phonology approach to consonant cluster decomposition

In this paper an attempt is made at explaining the details of adapting English words to the Hawaiian language from the viewpoint of Government Phonology. It is common knowledge that Hawaiian has an extremely small inventory of speech sounds and replacements of many sounds from the donor language are frequently dramatic. Here we focus on the decomposition of English consonant combinations entering the lexicon of Hawaiian. It is shown that the process of deconstructing original clusters, which involves vowel epenthesis, consonant deletion or both, is not random and can be treated as regular to a certain extent. Apart from the perception and reinterpretation of source language structures, which play a major role in the process of adaptation, a handful of phonological strategies are described in terms of the major assumptions of Government Phonology. It is proposed that Hawaiian speakers who adapt new words from the English lexicon are capable of recognizing different structures and relations between phonological segments in the donor sound system and apply the repair strategies according to that recognition.

1.  Introduction

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