Show Less
Restricted access

Renaissance Craftsmen and Humanistic Scholars

Circulation of Knowledge between Portugal and Germany

Series:

Edited By Thomas Horst, Marília dos Santos Lopes and Henrique Leitão

The study of the relations between Portugal and the German-speaking countries in the 15th and 16th centuries is an intriguing topic that has attracted the interest of scholars for some decades. In recent years evidence accumulated has shown that there was still much to be known and even some large areas were still unexplored. In order to better grasp the nature of what was a complex historical phenomenon, an interdisciplinary approach to the topic turned out to be necessary by deepening the understanding of what is usually termed the circulation of knowledge. The present book shows how knowledge travels with people, with artifacts, along commercial lines, and is created and transformed by the intervention of individuals from various educational and social strata.

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Foreword: Renaissance Craftsmen and Humanistic Scholars (Thomas Horst / Marília dos Santos Lopes / Henrique Leitão)

Extract

Thomas Horst, Marília dos Santos Lopes and Henrique Leitão

Foreword: Renaissance Craftsmen and Humanistic Scholars

The study of the relations between Portugal and the German-speaking lands in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries is a very rich topic that has attracted the interest of scholars for some decades. The maritime expansion of Portugal and Spain created novel conditions that made Iberia the focal point to which converged people from all around Europe. The exciting novelties about the “new worlds” that had been found and the immediate recognition of the enormous potential that now opened to Europeans transformed Lisbon and Seville into cosmopolitan centres bubbling with activity. As is well known, merchants, diplomats, adventurers, naturalists, scholars and craftsmen of all sorts and from many different regions in the German-speaking states travelled to Portugal. Some of them were visitors, but many others settled in Lisbon for long periods and some even permanently. The obvious commercial interest that the very lucrative sea enterprises provided was surely the main stimulus for these events, but it would be simplistic to reduce such complex phenomena to the mere pursuit of profit.

Although studies about the relations between the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation and the Portuguese kingdom in the period of the maritime discoveries have been many, they have traditionally been pursued along well-established disciplinary boundaries. Thus, economic historians have studied in particular the commercial ventures of the banking and German business companies that operated in Portugal...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.