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Translation Studies and Translation Practice: Proceedings of the 2nd International TRANSLATA Conference, 2014

Part 1

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Edited By Lew N. Zybatow, Andy Stauder and Michael Ustaszewski

TRANSLATA II was the second in a series of triennial conferences on Translation and Interpreting Studies, held at the University of Innsbruck. The series is conceptualized as a forum for Translation Studies research. The contributions to this volume focus on humo(u)r translation, legal translation, and human-machine interaction in translation. The contributors also regard computer-aided translation, specialised translation, terminology as well as audiovisual translation and professional aspects in translation and interpreting.

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The transposition of Directive 2010/64/EU and Legal, Institutional and Actual Deficiencies of Court Interpreting in Greece (Anastasios Ioannidis / Zoi Resta)

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Anastasios Ioannidis & Zoi Resta, Ionian University

The transposition of Directive 2010/64/EU and Legal, Institutional and Actual Deficiencies of Court Interpreting in Greece

Abstract: The profession of Court Interpreting in Greece is still defined by the lack of prerequisites which are intricately linked with its professionalization. Our case study and conclusions were based on the professionalization model of Pöchhacker (2000) and the questionnaire-based survey of Kadric (2009).

Although court interpreting (CI) has not been specifically defined with a great consensus among translatologists, the overall purpose of providing interpreters in legal settings is viewed similarly: court interpreters provide communicative links “safeguarding understanding among all participants in legal proceedings involving speakers of other languages” (Shlesinger 2010, 1). Despite its profound significance, it was not until the end of the 20th century that CI started to become regulated by law or professional bodies in some countries (Mikkelson 2000, 5; Driesen 2003, 314). Nevertheless, the profession in Greece is still defined by the lack of these prerequisites that according to the literature are intricately linked with the progress in the professionalisation of CI, such as academisation etc. (Rudvin 2007, 65 ff.; Pöchhacker 2000, 42). From a legal point of view, however, it appears that the Greek law framework provides a high level of protection for those who do not understand the language of the proceedings. The rights to interpretation have been enshrined since 1950 in Articles 233 et seq. of the Greek Code of Criminal Procedure...

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