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New Developments in Postcolonial Studies

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Edited By Malgorzata Martynuska and Elzbieta Rokosz-Piejko

This book analyses the applicability of postcolonial theories and contemporary issues, and also revisits previously tackled cultural, social and literary phenomena. The contributions examine contemporary social, economic and cultural processes. The authors look back at older cultural texts, coming from either former colonies or former colonisers. They furthermore refer to the fact that theories of postcolonialism are currently more frequently applied to study countries originally not classified as colonial. They attempt to define and explain the experiences of the native peoples of colonial territories in various historical situations of dependence.

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Stimuli and Challenges of “Mozambican Identity” in Africa. A Brief Analysis of the Processes of the Construction of National and Cultural Identity in Mozambique: A Postcolonial Approach (Fabrício Dias da Rocha)

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Fabrício Dias da Rocha

Stimuli and Challenges of “Mozambican Identity” in Africa. A Brief Analysis of the Processes of the Construction of National and Cultural Identity in Mozambique: A Postcolonial Approach

Abstract: The article discusses the process of the formation of Mozambican national and cultural identity as influenced by numerous historical and social processes, with special attention drawn to impact of the Portuguese colonization of the country.

Key words: heterogeneous groups, identity, colonization, ethnicity, hybridization, Mozambique.

Introduction

In the first instance, I would like to point out that researching the constitution of identities or identity processes, whether of countries or heterogeneous cultural groups, is always a field marred by uncertainty, as social identity—national and/or cultural—is not derived from a specific event in history, and less a direct result of some existential paradigm, but rather is composed by intersections of numerous disparate and interconnected episodes. Furthermore, compilations of factual records often are not coeval, thus contributing to the elucidation of an accurate identity analysis and its composition.

Through the study of historical and social processes, and through analysing the participation of “non-black” minorities in the events that culminated in the formation of the Mozambican national state, I seek not just to reflect on how such events were determinant in the composition processes of Mozambican national identity, but how power relations in the modern colonial period—framed by a maintenance and also by...

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