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Genre Emergence

Developments in Print, TV and Digital Media

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Edited By Alexander Brock, Jana Pflaeging and Peter Schildhauer

This volume presents a range of academic approaches to genre emergence which is representative of the currently ongoing research, while retaining a common methodological core. The articles presented here use methods from text linguistics, conversation analysis, literary studies and media linguistics. Different driving forces of genre emergence are identified, e.g. function, communication form and culture. This book also aims to cover the emergence of many different genres: It includes chapters on newspaper and magazine genres, readers’ comments, print advertisements, TV news shows and sitcom series, Wutreden, shitstorms, weblogs and erotic romance novels.

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Genre Theory and the Digital Revolution: Towards a Multidimensional Model of Genre Emergence, Classification and Analysis (Eva Martha Eckkrammer)

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Eva Martha Eckkrammer

Genre Theory and the Digital Revolution: Towards a Multidimensional Model of Genre Emergence, Classification and Analysis

Abstract: The radical changes in our communicative habits in the course of the digital revolution pose challenges to genre theory. The dynamic non-linearity, interactivity and multimodality of hypertextual genres urge us particularly to combine different approaches in order to meet these challenges. In this paper I therefore aim at connecting the systemic functionally based genre concept with the one stemming from German text linguistics in order to elaborate a multidimensional model of genre emergence, classification and analysis. It departs from a precise social setting, from which the genre emerges, drawing from previously existing discourse traditions and genres of a communicative household. Subsequently the model circularly accounts for choices to be made in terms of function(s), content, conception, communicative form or media genre, medium, form, macro- and microstructure.

1.  Introduction

1.1  Changing Habits

The radical changes in our communicative households (Luckmann 1988: 287) and habits in the course of the digital revolution have led to an accelerated process of generic evolution. It goes without saying that the so-called “digital natives” (Prensky 2001; currently turning into “mobile natives,” cf. Best & Engel 2016) communicate differently to reach the same social goals and that non-native generations feel practically forced into digital grounds, coping more or less efficiently with the new tools and practices. Genres as “recurrent ways of using...

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