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My Neighbour’s God

Interfaith Spaces and Claims of Religious Identity

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Edited By Andreas Kunz-Lübcke

In the latest discussion on the relations between religions, it has often been argued that monotheism necessarily leads to intolerance and exclusivism. A religion which claims to worship «the one and only true God» is inevitably forced to reject every religious behaviour and practices of «the Other». But is this really the case? This volume contains contributions which discuss the major question: What are the instruments and the strategies used in different religious settings where interreligious encounter is part of daily life? Most of the contributions concentrate on the challenges of theology in the context of India. A special focus will be on approaches for interreligious coexistence derived from Biblical or Systematic Theology.

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Hindustani Institutions – Endeavours for Strengthening Societal Presence in Holland

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Abstract: The focus of “Hindustani Institutions – Endeavours for strengthening societal presence in Holland” is on the practice of social work organised by Dutch Hindus with Surinamese roots. This description will be interpreted on the basis of theories of social and educational sciences. In addition, a comparison of practice with Vedas and Hindu philosophy will be given in order to be able to give a normative reflection and have a theological basis for strategic and pragmatic recommendations that will be made in the end of the article.

Keywords: Hindustani migration, Surinamese Hindus, colonial policy

1. Introduction

In this chapter, the focus is on the practice of social work organised by Dutch Hindus with Surinamese roots. Most Hindus in the Netherlands originally come from the former Dutch colony (1667–1975) Suriname1. After a historical overview, social policy concerning migrants from Suriname as well as the activities of (social-) pedagogical associations of and for this target group will be described. This description will be interpreted on the basis of theories of social and educational sciences. Where can we see signs and signals for inclusion or exclusion, acknowledgement of plurality in daily life or rejection of this diversity, (in)effective communication and (in)sufficient (social) management processes for and in Hindu temples, Hindu welfare institutions and Hindu private schools? In addition, a comparison of practice with Vedas and Hindu philosophy will be given in order to be able to give a normative reflection and have a...

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