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The Historical Distinctiveness of Central Europe

A Study in the Philosophy of History

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Krzysztof Brzechczyn

The aim of this book is to explain economic dualism in the history of modern Europe. The emergence of the manorial-serf economy in the Bohemia, Poland, and Hungary in the 16th and the 17th centuries was the result of a cumulative impact of various circumstantial factors. The weakness of cities in Central Europe disturbed the social balance – so characteristic for Western-European societies – between burghers and the nobility. The political dominance of the nobility hampered the development of cities and limited the influence of burghers, paving the way to the rise of serfdom and manorial farms. These processes were accompanied by increased demand for agricultural products in Western Europe

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List of Figures

List of Figures

Fig. 1: The power of influence of factors H and p on F.

Fig. 2: The order of the power of influence of the factors H, A, B, C, D, . . ., N on F.

Fig. 3: Structure of the idealizational theory of science.

Fig. 4: Two types of essential structures.

Fig. 5: A cascade process;

Fig. 6: Basic types of societies in non-Marxian historical materialism.

Fig. 7: The dependence of the level of the class struggle of the citizenry on civil alienation

Fig. 8: An evolution of a purely political society.

Fig. 9: The dependency of the level of class struggle on the alienation of labor.

Fig. 10: Development of an economic society (the standard no-loop variant).

Fig. 11: Development of an economic society. Confrontational variant of a defeat.

Fig. 12: Development of an economic society: a single labor loop variant.

Fig. 13: Non-rationalistic model of man.

Fig. 14: Relation power – civil society.

Fig. 15: The dependency of the level of class struggle on the alienation of labor.

Fig. 16: Two types of revolution in the development of an economic society.

Fig. 17: Social resistance of the unemployed.

Fig. 18: The dependency of the intensity of class struggle on the alienation of labor of the employed strata of the class of direct producers.

Fig. 19: The dependency of the intensity of class struggle on the alienation of labor in a society with a surplus of manpower.

Fig. 20: Development of an economic society with surplus workforce.

Fig. 21: Dependency between the intensity of economic class struggle and the alienation of labor in a society with a shortage of manpower.

Fig. 22: Evolution of an economic society with a shortage of manpower.

Fig. 23: The core of the cascade of European differentiation.

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Fig. 24: The Polish variant of the cascade of developmental differentiation.

Fig. 25: The Hungarian variant of the cascade of developmental differentiation.

Fig. 26: The Bohemian variant of the cascade of European differentiation.

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