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Human Being – Being Human

A Theological Anthropology in Biblical, Historical, and Ecumenical Perspective

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Billy Kristanto

The ecumenical dialogues within Christianity mostly concentrate on the issues of justification, the Church, and the Holy Spirit. An ecumenical theological anthropology can rarely be found. The book presents the classical topics in theological anthropology from the Reformed, Lutheran, Roman Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox perspectives. The plurality or sometimes even the apparent tensions among theological traditions are shown to be within the limits of God’s word alone.

"In this fascinating book, Kristanto shares his thoughts on biblical notions, his vast explorations in the history of theology, and his analysis of today´s intellectual challenges. Bringing these all together in one highly readable work, Kristanto manages to demonstrate perfectly the relevance of the biblical concept of the human being for the Church and society."

Herman Selderhuis

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Preface

Preface

Extract

At the end of the systematic theological rigorosum on Moltmann’s anthropology, my supervisor Michael Welker asked me which approach I am going to use for my theological anthropology. Fully unprepared, I answered spontaneously that I am going to use the motif of suffering, just like Moltmann. Over the course of the years, however, I am more inclined to develop the motif of Christian virtues from ecumenical perspective than the suffering-motif for my theological anthropology.

The ecumenical dialogues between Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, and Eastern Orthodoxy mostly concentrate on the issue of justification, the church, and the Holy Spirit. An ecumenical theological anthropology can rarely be found. Although theological anthropology has been on the rise lately, one can hardly find writings that reflect this locus in ecumenical perspective. Coming from a Reformed evangelical background, I shall present the classical topics in theological anthropology not only from Reformed, but also from Lutheran, Roman Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox perspectives.

Beside this ecumenical approach, this theological anthropology can also be characterized as biblical theology as has been pioneered by Welker. Yet, perhaps with different agenda, the biblical approach in this book serves as a mediating point between various theological traditions. Thoughts on biblical notions on the key topics of theological anthropology will be discussed in order to show the indebtedness of various traditions to the richness of the Holy Scripture. The plurality or sometimes even the apparent tensions among theological traditions are shown to be within the limits of God’s word...

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