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Empirical Perspectives on CLIL Classroom Discourse

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Edited By Christiane Dalton-Puffer and Ute Smit

Similar to immersion, Content and language Integrated Learning (CLIL) combines second language education with other content-subjects and has become an important educational approach in many parts of the world. Only recently research on CLIL classrooms has started to emerge on the international scene. This volume presents current work dealing with classrooms located in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Finland, Germany and the UK, focussing on various dimensions of classroom talk such as oral proficiency, repair, the structure of learning opportunities, cognitive effects, pragmatic differences from traditional EFL lessons as well as issues of research methodology. These are complemented by the discussion of educational policies and the perceptions and attitudes of CLIL teachers.

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Rolf Wiesemes - Developing a methodology for CLIL classroom research: a case study of a CLIL classroom where the Holocaust is taught 275

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Developing a methodology for CLIL classroom re- search: a case study of a CLIL classroom where the Holocaust is taught Rolf Wiesemes I could not imagine it being possible going to Auschwitz without hav- ing basic historical knowledge [ ... ] and without having basic moral and philosophical knowledge. (Learner interview comment) 1. Introduction The above learner comment sums up current debates about the teaching and learning of the Holocaust. The literature on the teaching of the Holo- caust develops this argument into a debate about the weighing of the moral and historical aspects of the Holocaust that are to be conveyed to the learners. This paper sets out to develop a CLIL research framework that extends current CLIL research beyond SLA research. It focuses on some methodological dilemmas that researchers are faced with when con- ducting research into the teaching of the Holocaust through a foreign lan- guage. It is based on preliminary findings of an on-going investigation into the teaching of the Holocaust through a foreign language. Although the current research data are limited, their collection and analysis raise a range of issues that CLIL researchers face. The overall research question - what happens in classrooms where sensitive issues such as the Holocaust are taught through a foreign lan- guage? -raises a series of fundamental research problems such as: • Do current CLIL research frameworks and methods enable re- searchers to ask the right questions? • Do current CLIL research frameworks and methods enable re- searchers to collect data that allow us to...

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