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The Yearbook on History and Interpretation of Phenomenology 2015

New Generative Aspects in Contemporary Phenomenology

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Edited By Jana Trajtelová

The Yearbook on History and Interpretation of Phenomenology 2015 is dedicated to the question of generativity, and more broadly to the generative aspects of and in contemporary phenomenology. We continue to proceed in Husserlian research as well as to address newly emerging contemporary cultural, political, and ecological phenomena. This invites and welcomes a creative involvement with a generative phenomenological approach, which tries to address such phenomena as the liminality and volatility of experience, interpersonal and intercultural communication, home and alienness, identity and difference, globalization and fundamentalism, migration and interculturalism, and searches for the meaning of authentic sociality, morality or religiosity of human persons.

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Die haptisch korrelative Genesis von Raum/Ort und eigener bzw. ‚intersubjektiver‘ Leiblichkeit an den Rändern der Phänomenologie Husserls Die originäre Entstehung der Ur-präsenzen an den Grenzen der Gegebenheit (Irene Breuer)

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Irene Breuer Die haptisch korrelative Genesis von Raum/Ort und eigener bzw. ‚intersubjektiver‘ Leiblichkeit an den Rändern der Phänomenologie Husserls Die originäre Entstehung der Ur-präsenzen an den Grenzen der Gegebenheit Abstract The haptic-correlative genesis of space/place and lived/‘intersubjective’ body on the edges of husserlian phenomenology: The original generation of proto-phenomena at the limits of givenness Husserl, the founder of phenomenology, not only distinguishes but integrates in a crea- tive manner a “material” and a “living nature”, body and conscious life: The human material body (Körper) is the substratum of the lived-body (Leib), which is endowed with psychic properties. But lived-bodies “are not material realities in the proper sense”, because they are neither divisible nor extended (verbreitet) in space, yet ordered into space and endowed with a peculiar extension (Ausbreitung) and a psychic reality. Husserl rethinks this issue and by opposing materialism as well as idealism, displaces the analysis of materiality into the realm of the natural attitude: A body taken in isolation might be a mere illusion; the reality, what Husserls calls “materiality” of the body, lies in its “relation” to things in an environment. The third term which not only relates those realities but constitutes the space of perceived things is the lived-body. The lived-body is not a phenomenon among others: it not only senses the outer world but feels itself; we experience a live-body as experiencing. It has two types of interrelated specific sensations: the “kinaesthetic sensations”—a system of subjective movements which...

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