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Colonialism and Decolonization in National Historical Cultures and Memory Politics in Europe

Modules for History Lessons

Edited By Uta Fenske, Daniel Groth, Klaus-Michael Guse and Bärbel P. Kuhn

Colonialism and decolonization are historical phenomena that are part of the historical experience of many European countries. This volume offers students and teachers a new understanding of how colonialism and decolonization fit into our shared European past and contains teaching materials for history classes in European schools. The contributions have been produced by the EU project CoDec, involving partners from Belgium, Germany, Estonia, Great Britain, Austria, Poland and Switzerland. Analyzing colonial pasts, processes of decolonization and memory politics in different European countries from comparative and transnational perspectives, the study presents useful sources and practical suggestions for cutting-edge history lessons in European schools.
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Sugar – The Foreign is Copied

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Sources

Source 1: Gingerbread Tin

IFRI Siegfried Schuhmann Gingerbread Factory, Nuremberg. Photographer: Miriam Hannig.



Source 2: Sabina Welserin, Recipe for Nuremberg Gingerbread, 1553

Sabina Welserin: Niernberger lezeltlach zú machen [How to make Nuremberg gingerbread], 1553, quoted from: .

|| 163 || How to make Nuremberg gingerbread

Take one measure of honey and put it into a big pan, skim it well and let it boil for a while. Add 1 ½ pounds of sugar and continue stirring with a wooden spoon, leave it boiling as long as it takes to boil eggs, pour the hot mix into a quarter of flour, stir slowly and add the spices mentioned, stir slowly and not too long, take 1 lot of cinnamon sticks, 3 lots of nutmeg, 1 ½ lots of cloves, 6 lots of ginger, 1 pinch of nutmeg flowers, each of those cut or powdered in such a way that it is not too small, the ← 45 | 46 → cinnamon sticks especially should be only coarsely cut. And when you have put the spices into the dough, leave the dough as long as it takes to boil hard eggs.

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