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The Axiology of Friedrich Nietzsche

Nicolae Râmbu

In his unmistakable style, Friedrich Nietzsche approached the issue of all classes of values, not only the moral ones. The author presents Nietzsche as a philosopher of values par excellence by analysing vital and economic values, religious and political values, moral and aesthetic values, and, in addition to all these, value in general, with all its implications for human life and humanity. Nietzsche had an instinct for value, a faculty for feeling the finest nuances of the phenomenon of value, and a passion for knowing the axiological universe. These were extraordinary and have rarely been seen in the history of culture.
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Preface

Extract



Despite a rich literature dedicated to the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche, research on his axiology is still in its early stages. It is obvious that he did not develop a general theory of values, but it can be extracted with sufficient precision from his literary-philosophical discourse, because value is the preferred object of the philosophical reflections in all his work.

In his unmistakable style, Friedrich Nietzsche approached the issue of all classes of values, not only the moral ones. Vital and economic values, religious and political values, moral and aesthetic values and, in addition to all these, value in general, with all its implications for human life and humanity, became one by one the object of reflections so profound that it can be said that Friedrich Nietzsche was undoubtedly a philosopher of values par excellence. He had an instinct for value, a faculty for feeling the finest nuances of the phenomenon of value and a passion for knowing the axiological universe that were so extraordinary they have rarely been seen in the history of culture.

In this paper, I tried to a certain extent to apply Friedrich Nietzsche’s method to himself; I tried to be myself in relation to his work, a “subterrestrial at work, digging, mining, undermining”, as he said himself in the Preface of The Dawn of Day. Anyone who has the patience to read him lento and to dig inside his work and personality will still have much to discover. The...

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