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Constructing Translation Competence

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Edited By Paulina Pietrzak and Mikołaj Deckert

«The volume reflects latest trends and developments in the field of translator and interpreter training research, reconciling both theoretical and empirical approaches. The strength of the edited volume lies in its thematic and conceptual consistency, presentation and application of a variety of innovative methodologies and approaches and providing interesting, research-based practical solutions that can be effectively used in the classroom. I am deeply convinced that the volume constitutes a valuable, thought-provoking and useful contribution to the field that will be of interest to the community of researchers and educators.»
Dr hab. Joanna Dybiec-Gajer, Associate Professor, Pedagogical University of Cracow
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Magdalena Kizeweter – Elements of translation theory as part of practical translation classes: why, what and how. Remarks by a practical translation teacher

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Magdalena Kizeweter

University of Warsaw

Elements of translation theory as part of practical translation classes: why, what and how. Remarks by a practical translation teacher

Abstract The existence of a connection between translation practice and theoretical approaches towards translation may be considered a fact, either from the prescriptive or the descriptive point of view. Also, lectures and/ or seminars in translation theory do appear in translation training-oriented curricula. Thus, the idea of building a bridge that would link theoretical concepts with what the translation process appears to be like in “real life” is by no means a revolutionary one. However, it seems that the actual linking of the two phenomena in translator training does not happen by default. The problem is that while illustrating theoretical views with examples taken from the field of practice is only natural and much expected by students, the vice-versa operation of introducing theoretical considerations in a practical translation classroom appears to be a more delicate matter. Here, the teacher needs to be especially careful not to turn what is supposed to be practical activities into a lecture and not to make the students feel that they are wasting their time doing a course that touches upon theory even though the very word is not mentioned in its title.

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