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Spectrum of Emotions

From Love to Grief

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Edited By Wojciech Drąg and Ewa Kębłowska-Ławniczak

The authors of this volume discuss the tangible need for a revision of the vocabulary of emotion used in literary criticism and culture studies. The articles offer a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches to emotional states such as love, shame, grief, nostalgia and trauma. They demonstrate that the once stable concept of emotion disintegrates in the course of re-evaluation and is replaced by such notions as affects, passions, feelings and emotions. This volume examines the representations of emotion in drama, poetry and prose – from the anonymous Court of Love (ca. 1500) to Ali Smith’s How to Be Both (2014) – as well as in life writing, music, the visual arts and theology.
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Rod Mengham - The Obscene Emotions of Nell Dunn

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Rod Mengham

University of Cambridge

The Obscene Emotions of Nell Dunn1

Obscenity had an interesting career in British common law during the twentieth century. The Regina v. Hicklin case of 1868, had set the test of obscenity as “whether the tendency of the letter published is to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influence and into whose hands the publication might fall.” This remained the basic working definition until 1959, when the Obscene Publications Act added a mix of more conservative and more liberal conditions, whose outcome shall be the focus of this article. Prosecutions continued to be brought after 1959, at a fairly steady rate, right up to the 1990s when the number of cases tried began to fall off, largely because the Crown Prosecution service recommended a more diversified charging practice making use of “alternative offences,” such as Extreme Pornography, Indecent Photographs of Children, Revenge Pornography, Offences under the Video Recordings Acts of 1984 and 2010, Indecent Displays Act of 1981, Importation of Indecent and Obscene Material, and the Children and Young Persons (Harmful Publications) Act of 1955.

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