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Beyond the Classroom

Studies on Pupils and Informal Schooling Processes in Modern Europe

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Edited By Anna Larsson and Björn Norlin

The research on educational history has traditionally focused on its institutional, political and pedagogical aspects, more or less habitually analyzing schooling as a top-down, adult-controlled phenomenon. Even if change has been visible during the last decades, there still remain important topics that are rarely discussed in the field. These topics include practices related to day-to-day school life that are not part of the formal curriculum or classroom routine, but which nevertheless allow pupils to become actively involved in their own schooling. This book provides historical case studies on such extracurricular and informal schooling processes. It argues that the awareness of such topics is essential to our understanding of school settings – in both past and present.
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The Authors

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Emmanuel Droit is Lecturer at the University Rennes 2, France, and Associate Researcher at the Centre Marc Bloch in Berlin, Germany. His research concerns the social history of Communism in Eastern Europe, contemporary history and collective memory in Europe. Among his books are Vers un homme nouveau? L’éducation socialiste en RDA, 2009 (available in German as Vorwärts zum neuen Menschen? Die sozialistische Erziehung in der DDR 1949–1989, 2013) and with Sandrine Kott, Die ostdeutsche Gesellschaft: Eine transnationale Perspective, 2006.

E-mail: emmanuel.droit@uhb.fr

Joakim Landahl is Researcher at the Teachers Foundation, Stockholm. His field includes the histories of school discipline, childhood, the teaching profession and the history of ministers of education. His latest book is Stad på låtsas: Samhällssimulering och disciplinering vid Norra Latins sommarhem 1938–1965 [An imaginary town: Social simulation and discipline], 2013. At present he is writing a biography of Fridtjuv Berg, who was Minister of Education in Sweden in the early twentieth century.

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