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Hope for the Suffering Ecosystems of Our Planet

The Contextualization of Christological Perichoresis for the Ecological Crisis

Iohanna Sahinidou

The author reclaims the patristic Christological use of perichoresis by showing how in bringing together different entities, such as God and Nature in unity as the one person of Christ, we can acknowledge the perichoresis between divine human and nature. Christological perichoresis supports the idea that the whole creation is included in God’s recreated cosmos, in response to the redeeming power of Christ who entered the web of life as a creature. Trinitarian relationships bear a Christological message for intentional openness towards the «other». Thus ecofeminism can be considered from a Christian view, realizing Christ’s «cosmic» role in the salvation of the entire cosmos.
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I reclaim the patristic Christological use of perichoresis, by showing how in bringing together different entities, such as God and Nature, and looking at them in unity as the one person of Christ, we can acknowledge the perichoresis between divine and human and the divine and nature, while not confusing their identities. Christological perichoresis supports the idea that the whole creation is included in God’s recreated cosmos, in response to the redeeming power of Christ who became flesh and, entered the web of life as a creature. Trinitarian relationships bear a Christological message for intentional openness towards the ‘other.’ Thus I can consider ecofeminism from a Christian view, realizing Christ’s ‘cosmic’ role in the salvation of the entire cosmos. I make my case for an Christological perichoresis as an evolutionary step further in the direction of ecofeminist theology. The Christological reading of perichoresis can be an original contribution which supports my ecofeminist Christian view.

Christological perichoresis, as the divine form of contextualization, can enable us to follow Christ’s steps to contextualize by taking our own contexts seriously. Human contextualization can only be a witness of divine contextualization. The identifying of the nihil, out of which God creates the world with an undifferentiated ground of the Divinity, means that the Creator creates but creation is not the Creator. God is present in all things by virtue of their being created. If the actualization of the image of God in creation (Romans 1.20) depends upon humanity, the actualization...

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