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«Bis dat, qui cito dat»

«Gegengabe» in Paremiology, Folklore, Language, and Literature – Honoring Wolfgang Mieder on His Seventieth Birthday

Edited By Christian Grandl and Kevin J. McKenna

Bis dat, qui cito dat – never has a proverb more aptly applied to an individual than does this Medieval Latin saying to Wolfgang Mieder. «He gives twice who gives quickly» captures the essence of his entire career, his professional as well as personal life. As a Gegengabe, this international festschrift honors Wolfgang Mieder on the occasion of his seventieth birthday for his contributions to world scholarship and his kindness, generosity, and philanthropy. Seventy-one friends and colleagues from around the world have contributed sixty-six essays in six languages to this volume, representative of the scope and breadth of his impressive scholarship in paremiology, folklore, language, and literature. This gift in return provides new insights from acknowledged experts from various fields of research.
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Preface

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Bis dat, qui cito dat. – Never has a proverb more aptly applied to an individual than does this Medieval Latin rule of generosity and philanthropy to Wolfgang Mieder. "He gives twice who gives quickly," indeed, captures the essence of Wolfgang's entire career, his professional as well as personal life. As a Professor of German and Folklore at The University of Vermont for the past forty-three years, this tireless, self-effacing scholar and mentor has readily given his time, energy, wisdom, and experience to countless rising stars over a broad spectrum of academic disciplines. As Chair of the Department of German and Russian, Wolfgang was the first to read his colleagues' papers and articles, always ready to lend advice, suggestions, and encouragement. Each of the junior faculty who came up for tenure and promotion consideration over this period of time was carefully mentored and approved for promotion. Not only his fellow faculty in the Department of German and Russian, but his students over the past five decades have benefitted from Professor Mieder's demanding standards in the classroom and his guidance in countless senior honors theses. His popular course "'Big Fish Eat Little Fish': The Nature and Politics of Proverbs" as well as his seminars consistently attract the greatest enrollments not only from the Department's German majors. "Weit über das hinaus, was amerikanische Studenten von ihren Professoren erwarten, ist er einfach ein 'Gutmensch', dem es ein Herzensbedürfnis ist, ständig für andere da zu sein" ("Going far beyond what...

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