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The Socialist Opposition in Nehruvian India 1947–1964

by Boris Niclas-Tölle (Author)
Thesis 257 Pages

Summary

This book examines the political and developmental thought of the democratic socialist opposition party of India during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. It thereby contributes to a modern global history of political ideas and examines the role of Marxism, Gandhi and modernisation theory for the political development of India during the Cold War. The study focuses on the modernisation policies implemented by the Nehru government: Increasingly facing competing claims from Nehru to be pursuing socialist policies after the mid-1950s, the movement eventually broke apart and large numbers of socialists were assimilated by the Congress Party where they continued to shape Indian politics.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author(s)/editor(s)
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Table of Contents
  • List of used Acronyms
  • List of Indian Terms
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Socialism in Indian History
  • 1.2 Eurocentrism and the History of Socialism
  • 1.3 Which Indian Socialism?
  • 1.4 Sources: Secondary Literature and Articulations of the Socialist Movement
  • 1.5 Time-Frame and Chapter Arrangement
  • 2. The Socialist Movement before 1947
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Towards the Congress Socialist Party
  • 2.3 The Congress Socialists
  • Narendra Deva
  • Jayprakash Narayan
  • Asoka Mehta
  • Ram Manohar Lohia
  • Kamaladevi Chattopadhyaya
  • Surendranath Dwivedy
  • 2.4 The Congress Socialist Party
  • 2.5 The Modernist Marxism of the Congress Socialist Party
  • 2.6 Gandhi and Gandhism
  • 2.7 Nehru, the “Other” Socialist
  • 2.8 The United Front
  • 2.9 Conclusion
  • 3. Socialist Consolidation: The Socialist Party of India 1947–1952
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Towards the Socialist Party of India
  • 3.3 Nehru and the Congress after 1947
  • 3.4 The Programme of the Socialist Party
  • The Spirit of Gandhi
  • The Political Philosophy of Democratic Socialism
  • 3.5 The Transformation of the SPI as a Party Organisation 1947–1952
  • Mass Membership
  • Hind Mazdoor Sabha – The SPI’s Affiliated Trade Union
  • The Socialist International and the Turn towards Asian Socialism
  • 3.6 General Election 1951–1952: The Wave Breaks
  • 3.7 Conclusion
  • 4. New Ideas and Dispersion 1954–1964
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The Gandhist Turn
  • Lohia’s Turn to Gandhism
  • Narayan’s Spiritualism
  • Socialism as a Humanist Culture of Multi-Lingualism
  • Mehta’s Utopian Analysis
  • 4.3 The Project of Asian Socialism
  • The First ASC, Rangoon 1953
  • Anti-Colonialism, the Cold War and the Question of Non-Alignment
  • Constructing Asia
  • Decline after 1956
  • 4.4 The Disintegration of the PSP
  • Internal Conflicts
  • Nehru’s Deadly Embrace
  • The Long Fall Down
  • 4.5 Nehruvianism
  • Perspectives on Nehruvian Socialism
  • Modernisation and Transformation: the Case of Town Planning
  • Social Conservation
  • 4.6 Conclusion
  • 5. Epilogue: The Socialists and the End of Congress Unity
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Rise of the Left Wing
  • 5.3 Split of the Congress
  • 5.4 Socialists against Socialism
  • 5.5 Conclusion
  • 6. Conclusion
  • The Role of the Congress Socialist Movement as a Political Opposition
  • Nationalism, Anti-Totalitarianism and the Middle Way
  • Development
  • Socialism in the Context of India’s International Relations
  • Why does Indian Socialism Matter?
  • Table of Illustrations
  • Bibliography
  • Archives and online sources

| 11 →

List of used Acronyms

| 13 →

List of Indian Terms

(Hindi, indicated in brackets if other)

| 17 →

“It is often remarked, and not always by the uninformed, that there are so many types of socialism that it is difficult to tell what is meant by the term.”

Jayaprakash Narayan, 1936.1

1. Introduction

1.1 Socialism in Indian History

Details

Pages
257
ISBN (PDF)
9783653060201
ISBN (ePUB)
9783653949650
ISBN (MOBI)
9783653949643
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631665732
Language
English
Publication date
2015 (August)
Tags
Marxism socialism social democracy history of political ideas cold war
Published
Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Wien, 2015. 257 pp.

Biographical notes

Boris Niclas-Tölle (Author)

Boris Niclas-Tölle visited archives and contemporary witnesses in India, Germany and the Netherlands for his examination of the history of the Democratic Socialist Movement of India. His research was funded by the Friedrich-Ebert Foundation, Germany. He holds a PhD in Modern History from Jacobs University Bremen, Germany.

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Title: The Socialist Opposition in Nehruvian India 1947–1964