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Autonomy, Agency and Identity in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching

by Jing Huang (Author)
©2014 Monographs 400 Pages
Series: Linguistic Insights, Volume 112

Summary

This book offers readers a basic grounding in autonomy and related concepts of agency and identity in foreign language education. The ethnographic study explores how autonomy develops within the long-term process of EFL and TEFL learning in a Chinese social and institutional context. Through examining the general characteristics and patterns within the long-term development of autonomy among the students, the enquiry puts under close scrutiny a number of fundamental issues in autonomy research and practice, such as reactive autonomy in relation to proactive autonomy, personal autonomy in relation to learner autonomy, other-control in relation to self-control in the «multi-control model» of autonomy, and also issues of autonomy in the transition from foreign language learning to foreign language teaching. The study presents the more «describable» concepts of identity and agency to investigate the development of autonomy in foreign language learning and teaching and explores their complex interrelationships. The book finally highlights major contributions and limitations of the investigation, and provides implications and suggestions for theory, pedagogy and research.

Details

Pages
400
Year
2014
ISBN (PDF)
9783035105582
ISBN (Softcover)
9783034303705
DOI
10.3726/978-3-0351-0558-2
Language
English
Publication date
2014 (May)
Keywords
theory pedagogy research development
Published
Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Oxford, Wien, 2013. 400 pp.

Biographical notes

Jing Huang (Author)

Jing Huang received his PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Hong Kong. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Education Studies at Hong Kong Baptist University. His research is in learner and teacher autonomy, TESOL teacher education, language learning autobiographies, and identity in foreign language learning.

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Title: Autonomy, Agency and Identity in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching