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Serious Games for Global Education

Digital Game-Based Learning in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Classroom

by Claudia Müller (Author)
Thesis 296 Pages

Summary

In the last few years, global education has become a key concept within the TEFL domain, suggesting competences, topics, and methods that enable students to become responsible and knowledgeable participants in a globalized world. With the help of a triangulated blended learning study conducted in five different middle school EFL classes, and an additional small group study, the author investigates the potential of digital games that have an educational purpose, so called serious games, for global education when used in EFL scenarios. The results show a clear contribution of serious games to global education when used with EFL learners, leading to a reference model of digital game-based learning in the EFL classroom.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Content
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • List of Images
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. Research Question and Methods
  • 2. Computer Assisted Learning
  • 2.1. Historical Background
  • 2.2. Computer Assisted Language Learning – CALL
  • 2.2.1. Task-based Language Learning
  • 3. Digital Game-Based Learning
  • 3.1. Introductory Remarks
  • 3.1.1. National Research on Digital Games in Education
  • 3.1.2. International Research on Digital Games in Education
  • 3.2. Games and Learning
  • 3.2.1. Introductory Remarks
  • 3.2.2. Digital Games
  • 3.2.3. Serious Games
  • 3.2.4. Digital Game-Based Learning
  • 3.3. Game Characteristics
  • 3.3.1. Interactivity
  • 3.3.2. Challenge
  • 3.3.3. Narrative
  • 3.3.4. Rules
  • 3.3.5. Feedback
  • 3.4. Digital Game-Based Learning and its Facilitators
  • 3.4.1. DGBL through Collaborative Scaffolding and Debriefing
  • 3.4.2. DGBL through Framing
  • 3.4.3. DGBL through Immersion
  • 3.4.4. DGBL through Identification
  • 3.5. Learning Outcomes
  • 3.5.1. Cognitive, Affective, and Procedural Learning Outcomes
  • 3.6. Learning Transfer
  • 3.6.1. Transfer through Identical Elements
  • 3.6.2. Transfer of Principles
  • 3.6.3. Summarizing Remarks
  • 3.7. Serious Games in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom
  • 3.7.1. Introductory Remarks
  • 3.7.2. Serious Games for Foreign Language Learning
  • 3.7.3. Summarizing Remarks
  • 4. Global Education
  • 4.1. Introductory Remarks
  • 4.1.1. Defining Globalization
  • 4.1.2. The Reciprocity between Education and Society
  • 4.2. The Development of Global Education, Internationally and in Germany
  • 4.3. Content and Competences of Global Education
  • 4.3.1. Content
  • 4.3.2. Competences
  • 4.3.3. Teaching for Participation?
  • 4.3.4. German Teenagers’ Civil Participation
  • 4.3.5. Summarizing Remarks
  • 5. Global Education in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom
  • 5.1. General Remarks
  • 5.1.1. Intercultural Competence and Global Education
  • 5.1.2. The Competences According to the KMK/BMZ Framework
  • 5.1.3. A Comparison between the Core Curriculum and the ESD Framework
  • 5.1.4. Teaching Global English?
  • 5.1.5. Summarizing Remarks
  • 5.2. Using Serious Games for Global Education in the EFL Classroom
  • 5.2.1. Using New Media for Global Education in the EFL classroom
  • 5.2.2. Using Serious Games in the EFL Classroom for Global Education
  • 6. Empirical Study Part I: Blended Learning Study
  • 6.1. Research Design
  • 6.1.1. Preliminary Decisions
  • 6.1.2. Development of the Research Design
  • 6.1.3. Conceptual Design and Assessment Instruments for the Blended Learning Study
  • 6.2. Game Used for the Blended Learning Study: I Can End Deportation (ICED)
  • 6.2.1. Reasons for Choosing ICED
  • 6.2.2. ICED’s Mission and Goal
  • 6.3. The Blended Learning Unit: Human Rights through DGBL with ICED
  • 6.3.1. Teaching Human Rights in the EFL Classroom
  • 6.3.2. The Blended Learning Unit
  • 6.4. Objectives of the Blended Learning Unit
  • 6.4.1. Communicative Competence – Reading Skill
  • 6.4.2. Ability to Recognize
  • 6.4.3. Ability to Assess
  • 6.4.4. Ability to Act
  • 6.5. Summarizing Remarks
  • 7. Results from the Students’ Evaluation
  • 7.1. Results from the Quantitative Evaluation
  • 7.1.1. Computer Gaming Behavior and Purpose of Gaming
  • 7.1.2. Using Serious Games in EFL Lessons
  • 7.1.3. Ability to Recognize
  • 7.1.4. Ability to Assess (Procedural)
  • 7.1.5. Ability to Assess (Affective)
  • 7.1.6. Ability to Act
  • 7.1.7. Communicative Competence
  • 7.1.8. Summarizing Remarks
  • 7.2. Results from the Qualitative Evaluation
  • 7.2.1. Gaming Experiences
  • 7.2.2. Learning Experiences
  • 7.2.3. Summarizing Remarks
  • 7.3. Results from the Game Logs
  • 7.3.1. Reading Comprehension
  • 7.3.2. Game Log 1
  • 7.3.3. Game Log 2
  • 7.3.4. Summarizing Remarks
  • 8. Results from the Teacher Interviews
  • 8.1. Participants
  • 8.2. Methodological Comments
  • 8.2.1. The Serious Game as a Tool in the EFL Classroom
  • 8.2.2. The Blended Learning Unit
  • 8.3. Didactical Comments
  • 8.3.1. Competences
  • 8.4. Summarizing Remarks
  • 9. The Empirical Study Part II: The Small Group Study
  • 9.1. Introductory Remarks
  • 9.1.1. The Participants
  • 9.2. The Games
  • 9.2.1. Mission 2: Flight to Freedom
  • 9.2.2. The Underground Railroad – Journey to Freedom
  • 9.2.3. Against All Odds
  • 9.3. The Evaluation Sheet Used
  • 9.4. Participants’ Evaluations
  • 9.4.1. Mission 2: Flight to Freedom
  • 9.4.2. The Underground Railroad
  • 9.4.3. Against All Odds
  • 9.5. Summarizing Remarks
  • 10. Conclusion: Using Serious Games for Global Education in the EFL Classroom
  • 10.1. Possibilities and Restrictions in Using Serious Games for Global Education in the EFL Classroom
  • 10.1.1. Deductions for EFL Learning
  • 10.1.2. Deductions for EFL Teaching
  • 10.2. Outlook
  • Bibliography
  • Attachment 1 – Student Questionnaires (I and II)
  • Attachment 2 – Evaluation Sheet used for the Small Group Study
  • Series index

Content

List of Figures

List of Tables

List of Images

List of Abbreviations

Acknowledgments

1. Introduction

1.1. Research Question and Methods

2. Computer Assisted Learning

2.1. Historical Background

2.2. Computer Assisted Language Learning – CALL

2.2.1. Task-based Language Learning

3. Digital Game-Based Learning

3.1. Introductory Remarks

3.1.1. National Research on Digital Games in Education

3.1.2. International Research on Digital Games in Education

3.2. Games and Learning

3.2.1. Introductory Remarks

3.2.2. Digital Games

3.2.3. Serious Games

3.2.4. Digital Game-Based Learning

3.3. Game Characteristics

3.3.1. Interactivity

3.3.2. Challenge

3.3.3. Narrative

3.3.4. Rules

3.3.5. Feedback ←5 | 6→

3.4. Digital Game-Based Learning and its Facilitators

3.4.1. DGBL through Collaborative Scaffolding and Debriefing

3.4.2. DGBL through Framing

3.4.3. DGBL through Immersion

3.4.4. DGBL through Identification

3.5. Learning Outcomes

3.5.1. Cognitive, Affective, and Procedural Learning Outcomes

3.6. Learning Transfer

3.6.1. Transfer through Identical Elements

3.6.2. Transfer of Principles

3.6.3. Summarizing Remarks

3.7. Serious Games in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom

3.7.1. Introductory Remarks

3.7.2. Serious Games for Foreign Language Learning

3.7.3. Summarizing Remarks

4. Global Education

4.1. Introductory Remarks

4.1.1. Defining Globalization

4.1.2. The Reciprocity between Education and Society

4.2. The Development of Global Education, Internationally and in Germany

4.3. Content and Competences of Global Education

4.3.1. Content

4.3.2. Competences

4.3.3. Teaching for Participation?

4.3.4. German Teenagers’ Civil Participation

4.3.5. Summarizing Remarks

5. Global Education in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom

5.1. General Remarks

5.1.1. Intercultural Competence and Global Education

5.1.2. The Competences According to the KMK/BMZ Framework

5.1.3. A Comparison between the Core Curriculum and the ESD Framework ←6 | 7→

5.1.4. Teaching Global English?

5.1.5. Summarizing Remarks

5.2. Using Serious Games for Global Education in the EFL Classroom

5.2.1. Using New Media for Global Education in the EFL classroom

5.2.2. Using Serious Games in the EFL Classroom for Global Education

6. Empirical Study Part I: Blended Learning Study

6.1. Research Design

6.1.1. Preliminary Decisions

6.1.2. Development of the Research Design

6.1.3. Conceptual Design and Assessment Instruments for the Blended Learning Study

6.2. Game Used for the Blended Learning Study: I Can End Deportation (ICED)

6.2.1. Reasons for Choosing ICED

6.2.2. ICED’s Mission and Goal

6.3. The Blended Learning Unit: Human Rights through DGBL with ICED

6.3.1. Teaching Human Rights in the EFL Classroom

6.3.2. The Blended Learning Unit

6.4. Objectives of the Blended Learning Unit

Details

Pages
296
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631734728
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631734735
ISBN (PDF)
9783631734711
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631734704
Language
English
Publication date
2017 (November)
Tags
Digital Games Foreign Language Classroom Empirical Study
Published
Frankfurt am Main, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2017. 296 pp., 15 ill., 56 tables, 16 graphs

Biographical notes

Claudia Müller (Author)

Claudia Mueller studied English and French at the University of Potsdam before passing her Second State Examination in Berlin. Prior to joining the Didactics Department at the TU Braunschweig, she worked as a teacher and lecturer at different institutions in California. She currently works at the German International School in Berkeley, California.

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Title: Serious Games for Global Education