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ESOL Provision in the UK and Ireland: Challenges and Opportunities

by Freda Mishan (Volume editor)
Edited Collection XVI, 404 Pages

Summary

Situated within the context of unprecedented levels of inward migration to the UK and Ireland bringing with it all the complexities of integration, this volume focuses on a key aspect of this - language provision. Through the voices of stakeholders in the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages (ESOL), this volume critically examines models of language provision and integration, the relationship between language and identity, developing ESOL practices and ESOL policy. A distinctive feature is the diversity of contributions, ranging from research studies to vignettes presenting living portraits of ESOL practice on the ground. The volume fills an urgent gap in this area, offering a snapshot of the ‘state of the art’ of ESOL in the UK and Ireland and projections of how the needs of new migrants can be addressed into the future.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the editor
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of figures
  • List of tables
  • Acknowledgements
  • Foreword (James Simpson)
  • Introduction: The ESOL landscape of the UK and Ireland (Freda Mishan)
  • Part I Identity, Language and Citizenship
  • Vignette 1. 2016–2017: Creating an identity: ‘Can I put “diamond trader” on my CV?’ (what it really means to migrate to the UK through Calais) (Philippa Grimes)
  • 1 The construction of an independent Irish identity (Kevin McCarthy)
  • 2 Effects of the UK’s government language policy on ESOL for citizenship learners and teachers (Sundus Ameer)
  • 3 Socioeconomic class and learning English as a second language: A case study of Gujarati women in London (Smita Ray)
  • Part II Models of Provision: ESOL Initiatives in the UK and Ireland
  • Vignette 2. ESOL outside the traditional classroom setting: The Language Café (Diana Tremayne)
  • Case Study 1. Full-time ESOL provision, 2002–2017, Limerick City, Ireland (Michelle Benson)
  • 4 Refugee resettlement in rural Wales: A collaborative approach (Mike Chick)
  • 5 An investigation of ESOL provision for adult Syrian refugees in Ireland: Voices of support providers (Bronagh Ćatibušić / Fiona Gallagher / Shadi Karazi)
  • 6 Motivating unaccompanied minors in the ESOL classroom (Jeremy Idle / Lyn Ma)
  • Vignette 3. ESOL outside the traditional classroom setting: Heart and Parcel – combining dumplings and ESOL (Diana Tremayne)
  • Part III The ESOL Practitioner: Education, Training and Insights
  • 7 ESOL, emancipation and ‘comfort radicalism’: Perceptions of ESOL practitioners in the Scottish further education sector (Steve Brown)
  • 8 Building partnerships between teacher education programmes and post-primary schools in Ireland to better address the needs of EAL pupils (Angela Farrell / Joanna Baumgart)
  • 9 Online training and development for those who work with adult migrants with little or no home language schooling (Martha Young-Scholten / Rola Naeb)
  • Case study 2. Volunteer teachers working together: A refugee support group case study (Siân Etherington)
  • Vignette 4. 2014–2015: ‘Severe and multiple deprivation’ and the ESOL Research Forum (Philippa Grimes)
  • Part IV Responding to Diversity
  • Vignette 5. 2012–2013: ESOL and superdiversity in Birmingham, UK (Philippa Grimes)
  • 10 Beyond ESOL provision: Perspectives on language, intercultural and integration support for Syrian refugees in Ireland (Bronagh Ćatibušić / Fiona Gallagher / Shadi Karazi)
  • Case study 3. Are we failing ESOL literacy students by not taking account of SLA research in our approaches to teaching them? (Ann Cowie)
  • 11 Towards intercultural competence: A model-based framework for improving ESOL learners’ cultural content knowledge (György Nagy)
  • Vignette 6. The learners that publishers forgot (Kathryn Aldridge-Morris)
  • Conclusion. ESOL provision in the UK and Ireland: Challenges and opportunities (Freda Mishan)
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on contributors
  • Index
  • Series index

ESOL
Provision in
the UK and
Ireland

Challenges and Opportunities

Edited by
Freda Mishan

Oxford • Bern • Berlin • Bruxelles • New York • Wien

About the editor

Freda Mishan specializes in language learning materials development, including areas such as materials for intercultural language learning, blended learning and ESOL. She has forty years’ experience in the field of TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages), teaching in Italy, the UK and Israel before settling in Ireland. She completed her PhD at the University of Limerick and went on to do post-doctoral research as an IRC scholar, subsequently lecturing on the Structured PhD and MA TESOL programmes there. She is editor of the Materials Development Association (MATSDA) journal, Folio.

About the book

“As this excellent collection of papers makes clear, ESOL practice, and ESOL practitioners, and above all ESOL learners in the UK and Ireland have much in common. The voices of teachers and learners, heard loud and clear throughout this excellent and much needed volume, reveal a vibrant, but contested field, one that is concerned with much more than language learning. This is a must-read for anyone involved in or interested in migration, language education, and social cohesion and the connections between them.”

David Mallows, Principal Teaching Fellow,
UCL Institute of Education, London

Situated within the context of unprecedented levels of inward migration to the UK and Ireland bringing with it all the complexities of integration, this volume focuses on a key aspect of this - language provision. Through the voices of stakeholders in the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages (ESOL), this volume critically examines models of language provision and integration, the relationship between language and identity, developing ESOL practices and ESOL policy. A distinctive feature is the diversity of contributions, ranging from research studies to vignettes presenting living portraits of ESOL practice on the ground. The volume fills an urgent gap in this area, offering a snapshot of the ‘state of the art’ of ESOL in the UK and Ireland and projections of how the needs of new migrants can be addressed into the future.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Contents

List of figures

List of tables

Acknowledgements

James Simpson

Foreword

Freda Mishan

Introduction: The ESOL landscape of the UK and Ireland

Part I Identity, Language and Citizenship

Philippa Grimes

Vignette 1. 2016–2017: Creating an identity: ‘Can I put “diamond trader” on my CV?’ (what it really means to migrate to the UK through Calais)

Kevin McCarthy

1The construction of an independent Irish identity

Sundus Ameer

2Effects of the UK’s government language policy on ESOL for citizenship learners and teachers←v | vi→

Smita Ray

3Socioeconomic class and learning English as a second language: A case study of Gujarati women in London

Part II Models of Provision: ESOL Initiatives in the UK and Ireland

Diana Tremayne

Vignette 2. ESOL outside the traditional classroom setting: The Language Café

Michelle Benson

Case Study 1. Full-time ESOL provision, 2002–2017, Limerick City, Ireland

Mike Chick

4Refugee resettlement in rural Wales: A collaborative approach

Bronagh Ćatibušić, Fiona Gallagher and Shadi Karazi

5An investigation of ESOL provision for adult Syrian refugees in Ireland: Voices of support providers

Jeremy Idle and Lyn Ma

6Motivating unaccompanied minors in the ESOL classroom

Diana Tremayne

Vignette 3. ESOL outside the traditional classroom setting: Heart and Parcel – combining dumplings and ESOL←vi | vii→

Part III The ESOL Practitioner: Education, Training and Insights

Steve Brown

7ESOL, emancipation and ‘comfort radicalism’: Perceptions of ESOL practitioners in the Scottish further education sector

Angela Farrell and Joanna Baumgart

8Building partnerships between teacher education programmes and post-primary schools in Ireland to better address the needs of EAL pupils

Martha Young-Scholten and Rola Naeb

9Online training and development for those who work with adult migrants with little or no home language schooling

Siân Etherington

Case study 2. Volunteer teachers working together: A refugee support group case study

Philippa Grimes

Vignette 4. 2014–2015: ‘Severe and multiple deprivation’ and the ESOL Research Forum

Part IV Responding to Diversity

Philippa Grimes

Vignette 5. 2012–2013: ESOL and superdiversity in Birmingham, UK←vii | viii→

Bronagh Ćatibušić, Fiona Gallagher and Shadi Karazi

10Beyond ESOL provision: Perspectives on language, intercultural and integration support for Syrian refugees in Ireland

Ann Cowie

Case study 3. Are we failing ESOL literacy students by not taking account of SLA research in our approaches to teaching them?

György Nagy

11Towards intercultural competence: A model-based framework for improving ESOL learners’ cultural content knowledge

Kathryn Aldridge-Morris

Vignette 6. The learners that publishers forgot

Freda Mishan

Conclusion. ESOL provision in the UK and Ireland: Challenges and opportunities

Bibliography

Notes on contributors

Index←viii | ix→

Details

Pages
XVI, 404
ISBN (PDF)
9781788743747
ISBN (ePUB)
9781788743754
ISBN (MOBI)
9781788743761
ISBN (Softcover)
9781788743730
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (June)
Tags
ESOL English for Speakers of Other Languages Integration Migration
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Wien, 2019. XVI, 404 pp., 7 fig. b/w, 12 tables

Biographical notes

Freda Mishan (Volume editor)

Freda Mishan is a specialist in language learning materials development, including areas such as materials for intercultural language learning, blended learning and ESOL. She has forty years’ experience in the field of TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages), teaching in Italy, the UK and Israel before settling in Ireland. She completed her PhD at the University of Limerick and went on to a post-doctoral research study as an IRC scholar, subsequently lecturing on the Structured PhD and MA TESOL programmes there. She is editor of the Materials Development Association (MATSDA) journal, Folio.

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Title: ESOL Provision in the UK and Ireland: Challenges and Opportunities