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Enlivening Faith

Music, Spirituality and Christian Theology

by June Boyce-Tillman (Volume editor) Stephen Roberts (Volume editor) Jane Erricker (Volume editor)
Edited Collection XIV, 426 Pages
Series: Music and Spirituality, Volume 9

Summary

The relationship between Christian theology and music has been complex since the early days
of the Church. In the twentieth century the secularization of Western culture has led to further
complexity. The search for the soul, following Nietzsche’s declaration of the Death of God has
led to an increasing body of literature in many fields on spirituality. This book is an attempt
to open up a conversation between these related discourses, with contributions reflecting a
range of perspectives within them. It is not the final word on the relationship but expresses a
conviction about their relationship. Collecting together such a variety of approaches allows new
understandings to emerge from their juxtaposition and collation. This book will contribute to
the ongoing debate between theology, spirituality, culture and the arts. It includes contexts with
structured relationships between music and the Church alongside situations where spirituality
and music are explored with sometimes distant echoes of Divinity and ancient theologies
reinterpreted for the contemporary world.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the authors
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Illustrations
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Prelude
  • 1 Music, spirituality and prayer: A chaplain reflects on the possibilities for being (Terry Biddington)
  • Musicking
  • 2 Musical composition and mystical spirituality (Brian Inglis)
  • 3 The Western audience as congregation (June Boyce-Tillman)
  • 4 Spirituality by Heart (Nancy L. Graham)
  • 5 A new liturgical movement forward: Testing the reform of the reform through music (Wilfrid Jones)
  • Interlude One
  • 6 Spirituality and music in the religious life: A Religious reflects (Sister Aileen CSC)
  • Musical Listening in a Troubled World
  • 7 ‘Listen … with the ear of your heart’: Music and pastoral care (Gregory Clifton Smith)
  • 8 It is well with my soul: How spiritual music is relationship despite racism (Susan Quindag)
  • 9 Songs of soil, tracts of land: An agritheological analysis of the harvest section of Hymns Ancient and Modern, 1861 (Alexander Westmacott)
  • 10 Music and spirituality within planet and cosmos: Exploring the contribution of music to sharing the ideas of Thomas Berry (Helena Mary Kettleborough)
  • Interlude Two
  • 11 Learning theology through music: A homiletic reflection (Stephen B. Roberts)
  • Theology and Spirituality in Music Education
  • 12 Enhancing spirituality through music education in the New Apostolic Church (Conroy Cupido)
  • 13 The Road to Emmaus – An Easter Cantata: Collaborative and democratic song writing with children for worship (Julie Shaw)
  • 14 Incorporating spirituality into a twenty-first-century collegiate music curriculum (John Burdett)
  • 15 The intersection of spirituality and the ethic of care in music and music education (Olivia Dowd)
  • Theological and Spiritual Listening to the Many Languages of Music
  • 16 All people pray in their own language: The sacred music of Duke Ellington and Dave Brubeck (MacKinlay S. Himes)
  • 17 Theology down at the crossroads: The spirituality of the devil’s music (Stephen B. Roberts)
  • 18 The hymn as a pilgrimage of humankind: Translatability, identity and spirituality (Hetta Potgieter)
  • 19 What angels? Gregorian chant and spiritual meaning in a secular world: Reflections on an artistic collaboration between Gregorian chant ensemble Schola Nova Silvana and British poet Hilary Stobbs (Fabian Lochner)
  • Postlude
  • 20 Sermon on music: A priest preaches (June Boyce-Tillman)
  • Notes on contributors
  • Index
  • Series Index

Enlivening Faith

Music, Spirituality and
Christian Theology

Edited by
June Boyce-Tillman,
Stephen B. Roberts and
Jane Erricker

image
PETER LANG

Oxford • Bern • Berlin • Bruxelles • New York • Wien

Die Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche National-

bibliografie; detailed bibliographic data is available on the Internet at http://dnb.d-nb.de.

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

Library of Congress Control Number:

Names: Boyce-Tillman, June, 1943- editor. | Roberts, Stephen, 1966- editor. | Erricker, Jane, 1948-editor.

Title: Enlivening faith : music, spirituality, and Christian theology / June Boyce-Tillman, Stephen Roberts and Jane Erricker (eds.).

Description: New York : Peter Lang, 2019. | Series: Music and spirituality ;
9 | Includes bibliographical references and index.

Identifiers: LCCN 2019018961 | ISBN 9781788746205 (alk. paper)

Subjects: LCSH: Music--Religious aspects--Christianity.

Classification: LCC ML3921.2 .E65 2019 | DDC 246/.75--dc23

LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2019018961

Cover design by Peter Lang Ltd.

issn 2296-164X

isbn 978-1-78874-620-5 (print) • isbn 978-1-78874-621-2 (ePDF)

isbn 978-1-78874-622-9 (ePub) • isbn 978-1-78874-623-6 (mobi)

© Peter Lang AG 2019

Published by Peter Lang Ltd, International Academic Publishers,

52 St Giles, Oxford, OX1 3LU, United Kingdom

oxford@peterlang.com, www.peterlang.com

June Boyce-Tillman, Stephen B. Roberts and Jane Erricker have asserted their right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988, to be identified as Editors of this Work.

All rights reserved.

All parts of this publication are protected by copyright.

Any utilisation outside the strict limits of the copyright law, without the permission of the publisher, is forbidden and liable to prosecution.

This applies in particular to reproductions, translations, microfilming, and storage and processing in electronic retrieval systems.

This publication has been peer reviewed.

About the authors

The Rev Dr June Boyce-Tillman MBE is Professor of Applied Music at the University of Winchester and has published widely on music education, including an edited book on spirituality and music education. She is an Extraordinary Professor at North West University, South Africa, and an Anglican priest and honorary chaplain to Winchester Cathedral.

Stephen B. Roberts is an academic theologian, Anglican priest and amateur musician based in Cardiff. He has published in each of these areas and is currently investigating the relationship between how difference is negotiated in music and religion.

Jane Erricker was Associate Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Winchester. She has published widely in the field of spirituality, including jointly authoring and editing the books The Education of the Whole Child, Reconstructing Religious, Spiritual and Moral Education and Contemporary Spiritualities.

About the book

The relationship between Christian theology and music has been complex since the early days of the Church. In the twentieth century the secularization of Western culture has led to further complexity. The search for the soul, following Nietzsche’s declaration of the Death of God has led to an increasing body of literature in many fields on spirituality. This book is an attempt to open up a conversation between these related discourses, with contributions reflecting a range of perspectives within them. It is not the final word on the relationship but expresses a conviction about their relationship. Collecting together such a variety of approaches allows new understandings to emerge from their juxtaposition and collation. This book will contribute to the ongoing debate between theology, spirituality, culture and the arts. It includes contexts with structured relationships between music and the Church alongside situations where spirituality and music are explored with sometimes distant echoes of Divinity and ancient theologies reinterpreted for the contemporary world.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Prelude

Terry Biddington

1 Music, spirituality and prayer: A chaplain reflects on the possibilities for being

Musicking

Brian Inglis

2 Musical composition and mystical spirituality

June Boyce-Tillman

3 The Western audience as congregation

Nancy L. Graham

4 Spirituality by Heart

Wilfrid Jones

5 A new liturgical movement forward: Testing the reform of the reform through music←v | vi→

Interlude One

Sister Aileen CSC

6 Spirituality and music in the religious life: A Religious reflects

Musical Listening in a Troubled World

Gregory Clifton Smith

7 ‘Listen … with the ear of your heart’: Music and pastoral care

Susan Quindag

8 It is well with my soul: How spiritual music is relationship despite racism

Alexander Westmacott

9 Songs of soil, tracts of land: An agritheological analysis of the harvest section of Hymns Ancient and Modern, 1861

Helena Mary Kettleborough

10 Music and spirituality within planet and cosmos: Exploring the contribution of music to sharing the ideas of Thomas Berry

Interlude Two

Stephen B. Roberts

11 Learning theology through music: A homiletic reflection←vi | vii→

Theology and Spirituality in Music Education

Conroy Cupido

12 Enhancing spirituality through music education in the New Apostolic Church

Julie Shaw

13 The Road to Emmaus – An Easter Cantata: Collaborative and democratic song writing with children for worship

John Burdett

14 Incorporating spirituality into a twenty-first-century collegiate music curriculum

Olivia Dowd

15 The intersection of spirituality and the ethic of care in music and music education

Theological and Spiritual Listening to the Many Languages of Music

MacKinlay S. Himes

16 All people pray in their own language: The sacred music of Duke Ellington and Dave Brubeck

Stephen B. Roberts

17 Theology down at the crossroads: The spirituality of the devil’s music

Hetta Potgieter

18 The hymn as a pilgrimage of humankind: Translatability, identity and spirituality←vii | viii→

Fabian Lochner

19 What angels? Gregorian chant and spiritual meaning in a secular world: Reflections on an artistic collaboration between Gregorian chant ensemble Schola Nova Silvana and British poet Hilary Stobbs

Postlude

June Boyce-Tillman

20 Sermon on music: A priest preaches

Notes on contributors

Index←viii | ix→

Illustrations

Figure 2.1: Setting of ‘aspicits’ from Hildegard of Bingen, O vos angeli

Figure 2.2: Setting of ‘Jod’ from Couperin, Leçons de Ténèbres (third lesson)

Figure 2.3: Brian Inglis, ‘Alleluia’ from Prelude and Alleluia (opening vocalise; harp part omitted)

Figure 2.4: Inglis, ‘Alleluia’ from Prelude and Alleluia (ending)

Figure 2.5: Inglis, A Christmas Alleluia, first page of last section

Figure 2.6: Inglis, Visions of Sorrow and Joy, first page of final Hallelujah

Figure 2.7: Arvo Pärt, Stabat Mater (first entry of vocal parts)

Figure 2.8: Inglis, The Song of Margery Kempe, Scene 2, ‘Refrain (Margery’s tears)’

Figure 3.1. The complete spiritual experience in music (Boyce-Tillman 2016)

Figure 5.1: Attitude to congregational singing in Latin

Figure 5.2: Listening to Latin chant

Figure 5.3: Claimed singing

Figure 5.4: Familiarity with the Ordinary of the Mass

Figure 5.5: Familiarity with the parts of the Ordinary of the Mass

Figure 5.6: How well the parts of the Ordinary of the Mass are known relative to one another

Figure 5.7: Extent of the change of atmosphere

Figure 5.8: Quality of the change of atmosphere←ix | x→

Figure 5.9: Effect on prayer

Figure 6.1: Magnificat Antiphon for Christmas Day

Figure 10.1: The Spiritual Experience in Music (Boyce-Tillman 2016: 181)

Figure 10.2: Linking the spiritual experience of music to the planet and cosmos (Boyce-Tillman 2016: 129 adapted by Kettleborough)

Table 10.1: Exploring the contribution of music and spirituality to creating new ways of seeing the world using extended ways of knowing. Source: Kettleborough

Figure 12.1: The orchestra, choir and organist presenting music in the Silvertown Congregation/Concert Hall

Figure 18.1: O Jesus Krist melody (Norsk Salmebok 1985: 407)

Figure 18.2: ‘O God van Jakob melody’ (Liedboek 2001: 275)

Figure 18.3: Jerusalem←x | xi→

Acknowledgements

This book reflects a lifetime’s experience of music and Christianity. Many people, both professional colleagues and personal friends, have helped me along the way. A further area of exploration has been writing for many liturgical contexts which enabled me to examine the effect of context on Christian spirituality, including writing many hymns, songs and chants (Boyce-Tillman 2006). Here I am grateful to many feminist friends who have been prepared to experiment liturgically with me (Boyce-Tillman 2014). Collaboration with Kay Norrington and the Southern Sinfonia has enabled me to develop experimental large-scale performance pieces. Access to Winchester Cathedral, as a performance as well as liturgical space (as an honorary chaplain), is due to the generosity of the Very Rev. James Atwell, whose view of the cathedral as a place for everyone has informed not only the access that he gave to so many different groups of people but also the spirit in which that access has been granted. I am grateful to Elizabeth and Stanley Baxter at Holy Rood House, Centre for Health and Pastoral Care, Thirsk, Yorkshire where liturgical experiment happens continually. I am also grateful to Petra Griffiths of the Living Spirituality Network and the forming of the group interested in the Spirituality of Music within that organisation. I have valued my engagement with the Hymn Society of Great Britain and Ireland and especially my colleagues, Dr Ian Sharp and Dr Janet Wootton. Many friends have helped and encouraged me along the way, especially the Rev. Bill Scott, the Rev. David Page, Sue Lawes, Dr Carol Boulter, Ianthe Pratt and Myra Poole.

In the production of this book I am grateful to my fellow editors for their skills and to my personal assistant, Holly Pye. The University of Winchester provided research support. Professor Elizabeth Stuart, Professor Joy Carter, Dr David Walters, Professor Inga Bryden, Professor Simon Jobson, the Rev. Terry Biddington and the Rev. Chris Day have supported my work there in a variety of ways. At North-West University, South Africa, I am grateful to Professor Hetta Potgieter, Dr Liesl van der←xi | xii→ Merwe, Dr Gerrit Jordaan and Dr Albi Odendaal for their continued encouragement and opportunities to share my work.

Many of the chapters were originally given as papers at Study Days of the Tavener Centre for Music and Spirituality or conferences of The Spirituality of Music Education Group.

I am very grateful to Lucy Melville at Peter Lang for her encouragement in setting up the series Music and Spirituality, in which this book sits, and to our co-editor Jane Erricker for work such as copy-editing and indexing. I am grateful to my two sons, Matthew and Richard, and my granddaughter, Scarlett, for their continued encouragement of my creative enterprises.

Biographical notes

June Boyce-Tillman (Volume editor) Stephen Roberts (Volume editor) Jane Erricker (Volume editor)

The Rev Dr June Boyce-Tillman MBE is Professor of Applied Music at the University of Winchester and has published widely on music education, including an edited book on spirituality and music education. She is an Extra-ordinary Professor at North West University, South Africa, and an Anglican priest and honorary chaplain to Winchester Cathedral. Stephen B. Roberts is an academic theologian, Anglican priest and amateur musician based in Cardiff. He has published in each of these areas and is currently investigating the relationship between how difference is negotiated in music and religion. Jane Erricker was Associate Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Winchester. She has published widely in the field of spirituality, including jointly authoring and editing the books The Education of the Whole Child, Reconstructing Religious and Spiritual and Moral Education and Contemporary Spiritualities.

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