Loading...

Understanding the Development of Translation Competence

by Marta Chodkiewicz (Author)
Monographs 302 Pages
Series: Łódź Studies in Language, Volume 67

Summary

This book sheds new light on translation competence and its development. After reviewing recent theoretical and empirical perspectives, the author presents the methodology and results of one of few comprehensive, longitudinal, combined process/product studies of translation competence acquisition, which has cognitive and pedagogical implications. Carried out among translation students with varying levels of foreign language proficiency before and after their first 7.5 months of translator education, the study investigates translation product quality, the strategicness of the translation process, the strategicness of external resource use, and translation principles. It also examines perceived translation difficulty and quality as well as the impact of directionality and foreign language proficiency.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Acknowledgements
  • Table of contents
  • List of tables
  • List of figures
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1 Translation competence: Selected recent multi-componential and alternative models
  • 1.1 PACTE’s (2003) and Göpferich’s (2009) models
  • 1.2 Alves and Gonçalves’s (2007) model
  • 1.3 EMT model (EMT Board 2017, EMT Expert Group 2009a)
  • 1.4 González Davies’s (2004b), Kelly’s (2005), and Kiraly’s (2006) models
  • 1.5 Criticisms of multi-componential models and alternative models by Kiraly (2013) and Pym
  • 1.6 Concluding remarks
  • Chapter 2 Translation competence acquisition: Models and perspectives
  • 2.1 PACTE’s (2000) model of translation competence acquisition
  • 2.2 Alves and Gonçalves’s (2007) models of narrow- and broadband translators
  • 2.3 Kiraly’s (2013) models of incipient and expert translator competence and the emergence of translation competence
  • 2.4 Bergen’s (2009) model of translation competence acquisition
  • 2.5 Stages of translation competence acquisition based on Dreyfus and Dreyfus (1986), Chesterman (1997), and González Davies (2004b)
  • 2.6 Göpferich’s (2013) view of translation competence acquisition and Shreve’s perspective on translation expertise
  • 2.7 Concluding remarks
  • Chapter 3 Selected findings of empirical research relevant for the study of translation competence and its acquisition
  • 3.1 Functional approach and strategic decision-making and problem-solving
  • 3.2 Other selected features of problem-solving
  • 3.3 External resource use in decision-making and problem- solving
  • 3.4 Concluding remarks
  • Chapter 4 Methodology of the study
  • 4.1 Aim and scope of the study
  • 4.2 Research questions, hypotheses, and variables
  • 4.3 Research setting
  • 4.4 Participant selection
  • 4.5 Data collection methods and instruments
  • 4.5.1 Cue-based retrospective verbalisation
  • 4.5.2 Screen-recording
  • 4.5.3 Key-logging
  • 4.5.4 Camera recording
  • 4.5.5 Source texts and translation problems
  • 4.5.6 Retrospective questionnaire
  • 4.5.7 Questionnaire on translation beliefs
  • 4.5.8 Questionnaire on the two phases of the study
  • 4.5.9 Procedure
  • 4.5.10 Pilot studies
  • 4.6 Data processing methods and instruments
  • 4.6.1 Evaluation of the quality of the translation product
  • 4.6.2 Description and evaluation of the translation process: Prominent Attention Unit protocols
  • 4.6.3 Determination of Rich Points
  • 4.6.4 Processing of participants’ comments and reflections on the two phases of the study
  • 4.7 Data analysis methods and tools
  • 4.8 Concluding remarks
  • Chapter 5 Results and discussion of the study
  • 5.1 Translation product quality
  • 5.1.1 Group results
  • 5.1.1.1 Total error severity irrespective of directionality
  • 5.1.1.2 Total error severity depending on directionality
  • 5.1.2 Individual results
  • 5.1.2.1 Total error severity irrespective of directionality
  • 5.1.2.2 Total error severity without formal errors irrespective of directionality
  • 5.1.2.3 Total error severity depending on directionality
  • 5.1.2.4 Total error severity without formal errors depending on directionality
  • 5.1.3 Summary of findings and conclusions
  • 5.2 Strategicness of the translation process
  • 5.2.1 Group results
  • 5.2.1.1 Strategicness of PAU processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.2.1.2 Strategicness of RP processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.2.1.3 Strategicness of PAU processes depending on directionality
  • 5.2.1.4 Strategicness of RP processes depending on directionality
  • 5.2.2 Individual results
  • 5.2.2.1 Strategicness of PAU processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.2.2.2 Strategicness of RP processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.2.2.3 Strategicness of PAU processes depending on directionality
  • 5.2.2.4 Strategicness of RP processes depending on directionality
  • 5.2.3 Summary of findings and conclusions
  • 5.3 Strategicness of external resource use
  • 5.3.1 Group results
  • 5.3.1.1 Strategicness of external resource use in PAU processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.3.1.2 Strategicness of external resource use in RP processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.3.1.3 Strategicness of external resource use in PAU processes depending on directionality
  • 5.3.1.4 Strategicness of external resource use in RP processes depending on directionality
  • 5.3.2 Individual results
  • 5.3.2.1 Strategicness of external resource use in PAU processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.3.2.2 Strategicness of external resource use in RP processes irrespective of directionality
  • 5.3.2.3 Strategicness of external resource use in PAU processes depending on directionality
  • 5.3.2.4 Strategicness of external resource use in RP processes depending on directionality
  • 5.3.3 Summary of findings and conclusions
  • 5.4 Translation principles
  • 5.4.1 Group results for all and particular (pairs of) questionnaire items concerning translation beliefs
  • 5.4.2 Individual results for all and particular (pairs of) questionnaire items concerning translation beliefs
  • 5.4.3 Group and individual results for macro-strategies
  • 5.4.4 Summary of findings and conclusions
  • 5.5 Perceived translation difficulty
  • 5.5.1 Group results irrespective of and depending on directionality
  • 5.5.2 Individual results irrespective of and depending on directionality
  • 5.5.3 Summary of findings and conclusions
  • 5.6 Perceived translation quality (study and classroom)
  • 5.6.1 Group results irrespective of and depending on directionality
  • 5.6.2 Individual results irrespective of and depending on directionality
  • 5.6.3 Summary of findings and conclusions
  • 5.7 Participants’ comments and reflections on the two phases of the study
  • 5.8 Individual subject profiles
  • 5.8.1 Subject A (stronger sub-group)
  • 5.8.2 Subject B (stronger sub-group)
  • 5.8.3 Subject C (stronger sub-group)
  • 5.8.4 Subject D (stronger sub-group)
  • 5.8.5 Subject E (weaker sub-group)
  • 5.8.6 Subject F (weaker sub-group)
  • 5.8.7 Subject G (weaker sub-group)
  • 5.8.8 Subject H (weaker sub-group)
  • 5.8.9 Summary of findings and conclusions
  • 5.9 Concluding remarks
  • Conclusion
  • Contribution of study findings to TCA research
  • Strengths and limitations of the study
  • Pedagogical implications and avenues for future research
  • Appendices
  • Appendix A: Subject scores in first- and second-year English skills exams, selected academic courses, and school-leaving exam
  • Appendix B: Source texts and briefs
  • Appendix C: Retrospective questionnaire used in the second phase of the study
  • Appendix D: Questionnaire on translation beliefs
  • Appendix E: Questionnaire on the two phases of the study
  • Appendix F: Translation task duration
  • Appendix G: Procedure for native speaker evaluating translations
  • Appendix H: Samples from PAU protocols
  • Appendix I: Answers given by subjects to Questions 1, 2, 4, and 6 in the Questionnaire on the two phases of the study
  • Appendix J: Subject coding based on mean total error severity for all translations in both phases of the study
  • References
  • Series index

About the author

The Author
Marta Chodkiewicz is an assistant professor at the Department of Applied Linguistics at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland, where she teaches translation. Her research focuses on translation processes, translation competence and its acquisition, and the optimisation of translator education.

About the book

Marta Chodkiewicz

Understanding the Development
of Translation Competence

This book sheds new light on translation competence and its development. After reviewing recent theoretical and empirical perspectives, the author presents the methodology and results of one of few comprehensive, longitudinal, combined process/product studies of translation competence acquisition, which has cognitive and pedagogical implications. Carried out among translation students with varying levels of foreign language proficiency before and after their first 7.5 months of translator education, the study investigates translation product quality, the strategicness of the translation process, the strategicness of external resource use, and translation principles. It also examines perceived translation difficulty and quality as well as the impact of directionality and foreign language proficiency.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Acknowledgements

There are many people that have contributed to the research project discussed in this book, which evolved from my doctoral thesis. Without them, it would not have been possible for me to carry out the project and present it in its current form. First of all, I wish to express my gratitude to the supervisor of my doctoral thesis, Prof. Andrzej Łyda. I greatly appreciate his trust in giving me both independence and responsibility in completing the project as well as his expert guidance, in particular regarding the error assessment system used in the study. I am also grateful to the reviewers of the thesis, Prof. Magdalena Bartłomiejczyk and Prof. Marek Kuźniak, for their invaluable comments and suggestions, which have contributed to the quality of this book. Conducting the experiment would not have been possible without the generosity of Prof. Arnt Lykke Jakobsen, who kindly allowed me to use Translog for research purposes.

Special appreciation is due to all those who have assisted me in conducting the measurements, processing the data, and assessing the target texts, in particular to Dr Paweł Aleksandrowicz and Agata Różycka. My sincerest thanks go to the students that agreed to participate in the study as well as all the students I have taught at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University since 2010, who have inspired me to investigate the development of translation competence with a view to optimising the education process.

I am greatly indebted to my teachers from Maria Curie-Sklodowska University and the University of Surrey who have inspired me to undertake empirical research in the field of Applied Linguistics and taught me how to conduct it, in particular to Prof. Sabine Braun. I would not have become a translation researcher had it not been for the valuable guidance I received from them as a student. I am also sincerely grateful to my numerous colleagues that I have been able to discuss my research with, who have shared their helpful insights and inspired me with their work.

I am obliged to the authorities of Maria Curie-Sklodowska University for their support in this project, in particular for the funding from the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education that it was awarded. I appreciate the distinction that my doctoral thesis has received from the University of Silesia and the award granted by the President of Maria Curie-Sklodowska University.

I would also like to thank all those who have given me an opportunity to work in the field of language editing and translation services. Thanks to their trust in my professional competence and their feedback, I have gained substantial experience of the development of my own translation competence, as well as learning about the needs of translation clients, which has fed into my research and teaching.

On a personal note, I would like to give my heartfelt thanks to my family for their understanding, encouragement, and faith in me. Without your help and unwavering support, I would not have been able to complete this challenging and time-consuming project.

Table of contents

List of tables

List of figures

Introduction

Chapter 1 Translation competence: Selected recent multi-componential and alternative models

1.1 PACTE’s (2003) and Göpferich’s (2009) models

1.2 Alves and Gonçalves’s (2007) model

1.3 EMT model (EMT Board 2017, EMT Expert Group 2009a)

1.4 González Davies’s (2004b), Kelly’s (2005), and Kiraly’s (2006) models

1.5 Criticisms of multi-componential models and alternative models by Kiraly (2013) and Pym

1.6 Concluding remarks

Chapter 2 Translation competence acquisition: Models and perspectives

2.1 PACTE’s (2000) model of translation competence acquisition

2.2 Alves and Gonçalves’s (2007) models of narrow- and broadband translators

2.3 Kiraly’s (2013) models of incipient and expert translator competence and the emergence of translation competence

2.4 Bergen’s (2009) model of translation competence acquisition

2.5 Stages of translation competence acquisition based on Dreyfus and Dreyfus (1986), Chesterman (1997), and González Davies (2004b)

2.6 Göpferich’s (2013) view of translation competence acquisition and Shreve’s perspective on translation expertise

2.7 Concluding remarks

Chapter 3 Selected findings of empirical research relevant for the study of translation competence and its acquisition

3.1 Functional approach and strategic decision-making and problem-solving

3.2 Other selected features of problem-solving

3.3 External resource use in decision-making and problem-solving

3.4 Concluding remarks

Chapter 4 Methodology of the study

4.1 Aim and scope of the study

4.2 Research questions, hypotheses, and variables

4.3 Research setting

4.4 Participant selection

4.5 Data collection methods and instruments

4.5.1 Cue-based retrospective verbalisation

4.5.2 Screen-recording

4.5.3 Key-logging

4.5.4 Camera recording

4.5.5 Source texts and translation problems

4.5.6 Retrospective questionnaire

4.5.7 Questionnaire on translation beliefs

4.5.8 Questionnaire on the two phases of the study

4.5.9 Procedure

4.5.10 Pilot studies

4.6 Data processing methods and instruments

4.6.1 Evaluation of the quality of the translation product

4.6.2 Description and evaluation of the translation process: Prominent Attention Unit protocols

4.6.3 Determination of Rich Points

4.6.4 Processing of participants’ comments and reflections on the two phases of the study

4.7 Data analysis methods and tools

4.8 Concluding remarks

Chapter 5 Results and discussion of the study

5.1 Translation product quality

5.1.1 Group results

5.1.1.1 Total error severity irrespective of directionality

5.1.1.2 Total error severity depending on directionality

5.1.2 Individual results

5.1.2.1 Total error severity irrespective of directionality

5.1.2.2 Total error severity without formal errors irrespective of directionality

5.1.2.3 Total error severity depending on directionality

5.1.2.4 Total error severity without formal errors depending on directionality

5.1.3 Summary of findings and conclusions

5.2 Strategicness of the translation process

5.2.1 Group results

5.2.1.1 Strategicness of PAU processes irrespective of directionality

5.2.1.2 Strategicness of RP processes irrespective of directionality

Details

Pages
302
ISBN (PDF)
9783631831601
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631831618
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631831625
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631811122
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (September)
Tags
translation translation studies translation process translation product translator education teaching translation
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2020. 302 pp., 42 fig. b/w, 13 tables.

Biographical notes

Marta Chodkiewicz (Author)

Marta Chodkiewicz is an assistant professor at the Department of Applied Linguistics at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland, where she teaches translation. Her research focuses on translation processes, translation competence and its acquisition, and the optimisation of translator education.

Previous

Title: Understanding the Development of Translation Competence