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Cultural Heritage and Tourism

by Fatih Türkmen (Volume editor)
©2020 Edited Collection 362 Pages

Summary

This book, in which cultural heritage and tourism issues are evaluated at an academic level, is an indispensable resource for those who will study on culture, cultural heritage and tourism.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Book Abstract
  • Contents
  • List of Contributors
  • 1 Cultural Heritage City Safranbolu: Sevgi ÖZTÜRK and Yasin DÖNMEZ
  • 2 Cultural Heritage Tourism and Ancient Cities of TR21 Region: Bahar DEVECİ and Bilal DEVECİ
  • 3 Festivals and Publicity Effects in Tourism: Çağla ÜST CAN
  • 4 Determining the Cultural Route as a Protection Tool: Çiğdem BOGENÇ
  • 5 Tangible and Intangible Cultural Heritage Elements in Tourism: Ezgi KIRICI TEKELİ and Mehmet TEKELİ
  • 6 Turkish Baths in Tokat Within the Scope of Heritage Tourism: Hakan KENDİR and Emin ARSLAN
  • 7 Reuse of Industrial Heritage: Karabük Station Building: Beyza ONUR
  • 8 The Eighth Wonder Nemrut and Its Tourism Potential: Handan ÖZÇELİK BOZKURT
  • 9 Intangible Cultural Heritage: Local Food and Tourism: İrem BOZKURT and Enes YILDIRIM
  • 10 Landscape Characteristics of Coastal Towns: Bolaman Town Case: Melih ÖZTÜRK and Mustafa AR
  • 11 Modern Architecture in Karabük: Building Cultural Heritage: Beyza ONUR
  • 12 Storytelling as a Way of Inheritance of Culture
  • 13 Tourist Guiding in the Transmission of Cultural Heritage: Zeynep ÇOKAL
  • 14 Cultural Heritage of Kütahya and Its Importance in Tourism: Güllü GENÇER and Kansu GENÇER
  • 15 The Importance of Local Food in Terms of Tourism Publicity: Mehmet CAN
  • 16 Brand Identity and Brand Management in Historical Cities: Samet GÖKKAYA and Seza ZERMAN
  • 17 Crisis Management in Heritage Cities: Safranbolu: Yasin DÖNMEZ and Ahmet Alp ÖZBALCI
  • 18 Sustainable Cultural Heritage Policies in Tourism: Nilgün DEMİREL and Gülhan SÖZBİLEN
  • 19 Evaluation of Landscape Characteristics in Terms of Sustainability and Tourism, Case of Bartın: Ercan GÖKYER
  • 20 The Tourism Dimension of Sustainable Architecture: Safranbolu Hotels: Merve TUNA KAYILI
  • 21 Virtual Museums in the Axis of Changing Museum Perceptions: Ebru GÖZEN
  • 22 The Role of Culinary Heritage in Tourism Destination Marketing: Serdar EREN

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List of Contributors

Mustafa AR

Bartın University, Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Design, Department of Landscape Architecture, email: mustafaar85@gmail.com

Emin ARSLAN

Assist. Prof., Dr., Tokat Gaziosmanpaşa University, Zile Dinçerler Tourism and Hotel Management College, Department of Tourism and Hotel Management, email: emin.arslan@gop.edu.tr.

Çiğdem BOGENÇ

Assist. Prof., Dr., Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Faculty of Fine Arts, Design and Architecture, Department of Landscape Architecture, email: cigdem.bogenc@erdogan.edu.tr

İrem BOZKURT

Lecturer, Mardin Artuklu University, Mardin Vocational High School, Department of Hotel, Restaurant and Catering Services, email: irembozkurt@artuklu.edu.tr.

Mehmet CAN

Assist. Prof., Dr., Aksaray University, Güzelyurt Vocational School, Department of Hotel, Restaurant and Catering Services, email: mehmet23can@hotmail.com.

Zeynep ÇOKAL

Ph.D., Nevşehir Hacı Bektaş Veli University, Faculty of Tourism, Department of Tourism Guiding, email: zynpcokal@gmail.com

Nilgün DEMİREL

Ph. Dr., Iğdır University, Iğdır Vocational School, Department of Travel-Tourism and Entertainment Services, email: nilgundemirel90@hotmail.com

Bahar DEVECİ

Dr., Balıkesir University, Social Science Institute, Department of Tourism Management, email: bahar.dvc@gmail.com

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Bilal DEVECİ

Assist. Prof., Dr., Kırklareli University, Faculty of Tourism, Department of Gastronomy and Culinary Arts, email: bilaldeveci@gmail.com.

Yasin DÖNMEZ

Assoc. Prof. Dr., Karabük Üniversity, Faculty of Architecture, Department of Landscape Architecture, email: yasindonmez@karabuk.edu.tr.

Serdar EREN

Assist. Prof., Dr., Kutahya Dumlupinar University, Tavsanli Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Gastronomy and Culinary Arts, email: serdar.eren@dpu.edu.tr

Güllü GENÇER

Research Assistant Dr., Kutahya Dumlupinar University, Tavsanli Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Tourism Management, email: gullu.gencer@dpu.edu.tr.com

Kansu GENÇER

Assist. Prof., Dr., Kutahya Dumlupinar University, Tavsanli Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Gastronomy and Culinary Arts, email: kansu.gencer@dpu.edu.tr

Samet GÖKKAYA

Assist. Prof., Dr., Karabük University, Safranbolu Tourism Faculty, Department of Regression Management, email: sametgokkaya@karabuk.edu.tr

Ercan GÖKYER

Assoc. Prof. Dr., Bartın University, Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Design, Department of Landscape Architecture, email: ercangokyer@hotmail.com

Ebru GÖZEN

Assist. Prof., Dr., Akdeniz University, Manavgat Tourism Faculty, Department of Recreation Management, email: ebrugozen@akdeniz.edu.tr

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Hakan KENDİR

Assist. Prof., Dr., Tokat Gaziosmanpaşa University, Zile Dinçerler Tourism and Hotel Management College, Department of Tourism and Hotel Management, email: hakan.kendir@gop.edu.tr.

Ezgi KIRICI TEKELİ

Ph. D., Iğdır University, Iğdır Vocational School of Higher Education, Department of Travel-Tourism and Entertainment Services, Tourist Guidance Program, email: ezgi.kirici@igdir.edu.tr.

Beyza ONUR

Assist. Prof., Dr., Karabük Üniversity, Faculty of Architecture, Department of Architecture, email: beyzaonurr@gmail.com

Ahmet Alp ÖZBALCI

Ph. D., Samsun University, Rectorate, email: aalp.ozbalci@samsun.edu.tr

Handan ÖZÇELİK BOZKURT

Assist. Prof. Dr., Sinop University, School of Tourism and Hotel Management, Department of Gastronomy and Culinary Arts, email: handanozcelikbozkurt@gmail.com.

Melih ÖZTÜRK

Assoc. Prof. Dr., Bartın University, Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Design, Department of Landscape Architecture, email: melihozturk@bartin.edu.tr

Sevgi ÖZTÜRK

Assoc. Prof. Dr., Kastamonu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Landscape Architecture, email: sevgiozturk37@gmail.com.

Gülhan SÖZBİLEN

Lecturer, Nevşehir Hacı Bektaş Veli University, Cultural Heritage and Tourism Department, email: gulhansozbilen@nevsehir.edu.tr

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Mehmet TEKELİ

Ph. D. Student, Nevşehir Hacı Bektaş Veli University, Institute of Social Sciences, Department of Tourism Management, email: tekelimehmet@hotmail.com.

Merve TUNA KAYILI

Assist. Prof., Dr., Karabük University, Faculty of Architecture, Department of Architecture, email: archmervetuna@gmail.com

Çağla ÜST CAN

Dr., Aksaray University, Güzelyurt Vocational School, Department of Hotel, Restaurant and Catering Services, email: caglaust@gmail.com.

Enes YILDIRIM

Nevşehir Hacı Bektaş Veli University, Institute of Social Sciences, Department of Tourism Management, email: enesyildirim@nevsehir.edu.tr.

Seza ZERMAN

Ph.D., Karabük University, Safranbolu Vocational School, Department of Tourism and Hotel Management, email: sezazerman@karabuk.edu.tr

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Sevgi ÖZTÜRK and Yasin DÖNMEZ

1 Cultural Heritage City Safranbolu

Cultural Heritage

As a result of the 32nd General Conference held by UNESCO between 29 September and 17 October 2003 in Paris, the “Convention for the Protection of Intangible Cultural Heritage” was accepted (Kendir et al., 2019).

The concept of cultural heritage can generally be defined as natural and cultural values that are passed down from generation to generation. It is extremely important to reveal, sustain and protect all cultural heritage values for societies.

Over time, the scope of the concept of cultural heritage has expanded and has become a concept that does not include only concrete values such as historical remains and artifacts, but also includes abstract values that are related to human life.

Material and spiritual can be thought of as the entire accumulation of human existence.

The set of values that have survived until today, covering all life processes from people’s social lives to the architectural structures they create, can be called cultural heritage (Uzun, 2020).

In order for an area to be included in UNESCO’s World Heritage List, it must meet at least one of the six cultural and three natural criteria. These criteria are:

For cultural heritage:

1.Being a high level representative of the creative genius of man,

2.To witness the human value exchanges related to important developments in the fields of architecture or technology, monumental arts, urban planning or landscape design in a cultural region or a period of the world.

3.To be an exceptional, rare representative of a living or disappearing cultural tradition or civilization.

4.An exceptional example of a building type, architectural or technological whole or landscape that represents an important stage or stages in human history.

5.It is an exceptional example of traditional human settlement, land use or sea use; representative of a culture/cultures; or human interaction with the environment; especially sensitized under the influence of irreversible change.

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6.Artistic or literary works of exceptional universal significance, being directly or indirectly related to beliefs, ideas, living traditions and events.

For natural heritage:

7.Including areas with superior natural features or unique natural beauties and aesthetic importance.

8.Exceptional examples representing important stages in world history, including important geological processes or important geomorphic or physiographic features in the formation of landforms.

9.Exceptional examples presenting important ecological and biological processes on going in the evolution and development of terrestrial, freshwater, coastal and marine ecosystems, and animal and plant communities, In place of biological diversity, including places containing endangered species of exceptional universal value for science or conservation. It must contain the most important and remarkable natural habitats for protection (URL-1).

After the steps taken on behalf of cultural heritage in 1972 by UNESCO cultural heritage, Turkey has started its work in the 1980s. In 1985, the historical peninsula in Istanbul, Divriği Great Mosque and Hospital, Cappadocia and Göreme National Park were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Later, Pamukkale and Hierapolis, Nemrut Mountain, Troy ancient city, Xanthos-Letoon, Hattusas, Safranbolu, Edirne Selimiye Mosque and Complex were also included in the list (Öter & Ünal, 2011).

In recent years, cultural heritage has been damaged day by day due to climatic factors, the proliferation of air pollution, industrialization, rapid urbanization, mass tourism, changes in the lifestyles of societies and economic reasons (Öztürk et al., 2019).

It should be kept in mind that since cultural heritage elements are non-renewable and irreversible, it is not possible to recreate these damaged or destroyed values. For this reason, it is an obligation and a social responsibility to carry out conservation efforts in order to pass on cultural heritage values to future generations (Sarıkaya, 2011).

Culture Tourism

With the industrial revolution, the phenomenon of globalization, which had an effect all over the world, affected the cities, architecture, eating habits and lifestyle, and led to the loss of local values.

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The tourism sector is rapidly increasing its importance worldwide (Arslan et al., 2018; Tuna & Onur, 2019).

People living in the cities want to move away from the negativities of the city and head toward rural and mountainous areas, to see the natural and cultural features in these areas, to learn and experience the different life conditions in these areas.

When studies on “ecological tourism”, i.e., “ecotourism” are examined, it is seen that ecotourism is a sub-category of nature-based tourism (Dönmez et al., 2015; Göker et al., 2015).

The practice of producing the built environment has been influenced by the historical conditions of each period it has (Onur, 2018).

These and similar studies to take the opinions of the local people in order to develop sustainability and tourism in a region, which tries to cope with global warming, environmental pollution and lack of resources, have shown once again that tourism planners, professional organizations, experts, academicians, local administrations, tourism management owners, etc. offer important ideas to the masses.

Therefore, the fact that evaluations will be made on the basis of the opinions of the local people before each region is opened to tourism activities is the most basic issue that can support the solution of regional and even national-international problems (Türkmen & Dönmez, 2015; Tuna, 2020)

People have traveled from ancient times to the present for various reasons.

The first reasons for these travels are immigration, war, religion, trade, curiosity and health.

In addition, it can be said that the most important reason why people travel since ancient times is their desire to get to know cultures other than their own.

The global competition environment in the world tourism sector is getting more and more severe. It is observed that there are changes in consumption patterns in the tourism sector within the framework of the technological, economic and political changes that have emerged as a result of this (Uygur & Baykan, 2007: 30).

Since the last quarter of the 20th century, as a result of the maturation and satisfaction of the tourism industry, the desire of developing countries to increase their share in the world tourism market has increased.

The desire of countries to increase their share can only be realized by diversifying the tourism product range they offer to tourists, offering products suitable for the needs and desires of tourists, and increasing their quality. When the studies on world tourism movements are examined, it can be concluded that tourists do not prefer sea-sand-sun holiday types during their vacations ←15 | 16→and shift their preferences toward unique and different attractions outside of the usual activities.

As a result, besides tourism activities such as recreation, entertainment, health, sports, special interest tourism, adventure tourism, eco-tourism and cultural tourism types have emerged (Özdamar, 2011).

It can be said that the desire of tourists to see culturally rich places other than holiday tourism in the sea-sand-sun trilogy, to learn and watch the lifestyles that are about to disappear in the world, and to keep these values as a memory throughout their lives is increasing day by day.

In fact, the foundation of cultural tourism is based on various reasons. We can list these reasons as follows: seeing ancient artworks, historical buildings, museums, ancient civilizations and their remains, research, exploration and religious travel (Toskay, 1993: 156), general architectural and original features, libraries, local cuisine, festivals and fairs, theater and cinema, music and dance, language and literary studies, to get to know sub-cultures, to increase people’s knowledge and experience (Kızılırmak & Kurtulmuş, 2005: 102).

Details

Pages
362
Year
2020
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631842478
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631842485
ISBN (PDF)
9783631842461
ISBN (Softcover)
9783631842454
DOI
10.3726/b17866
Language
English
Publication date
2021 (March)
Keywords
Gastronomy Turkish tourism academic studies tourism sector
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2020. 362 pp., 86 fig. b/w, 17 tables.

Biographical notes

Fatih Türkmen (Volume editor)

Fatih Türkmen conducts education and research activities in the field of tourism management. His research interests include tourism, management, cultural heritage and sustainable tourism.

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Title: Cultural Heritage and Tourism