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Communication and the Baseball Stadium

Community, Commodification, Fanship, and Memory

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Edited By Dale Herbeck and Susan J. Drucker

Baseball stadia are places of memory, identity, athletic and architectural accomplishment. They are sites capable of arousing passion, sentimentality and a sense of community. The baseball stadium provides a unique lens through which to understand, explore and expand an understanding of communication theories. While baseball has previously been explored by scholars, this volume introduces the stadium as a way of exploring communication and communication theories through an examination of the four discrete themes that frame the organization of this work: community and communication, fandom and communication, memory and communication, and commodification and communication. This volume offers a unique approach to those interested in communication theory, popular culture, sports management, and people environment studies.

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Contributors

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Jonathan H. Amsbary is a Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He specializes in areas of applied communication and persuasion using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. He has also work at The University of New Mexico, Indiana University, The University of Hawaii, North Dakota State University, the University of Alabama and Ramkhamhaeng University in Bangkok, Thailand. A lifelong Cubs fan, he has learned the value of persistence and a belief in the promise of a new year.

Vincent Brook was born in the San Fernando Valley to German-Jewish refugees and has lived in Silver Lake, a stone’s throw from Dodger Stadium, for the past 38 years. He has a Ph.D. in film and television from UCLA, and teaches media studies at UCLA and California State University, Los Angeles. He has written dozens of journal, anthology, and encyclopedia articles, and authored or edited eight books. These include: Something Ain’t Kosher Here: The Rise of the “Jewish” Sitcom (Rutgers, 2003), You Should See Yourself: Jewish Identity in Postmodern American Culture (Rutgers, 2006, editor), Driven to Darkness: Jewish Émigré Directors and the Rise of Film Noir (Rutgers, 2009), Land of Smoke and Mirrors: A Cultural History of Los Angeles (Rutgers, 2013), Woody on Rye: Jewishness in the Films and Plays of Woody Allen (Brandeis 2014, co-editor), Silver Lake Chronicles: Exploring an Urban Oasis in Los Angeles (History Press 2014, co-author), Silver Lake ← 271 | 272 → Bohemia: A History (History Press 2016, co-author), and...

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